The contributions of BMP4, positive guidance cues, and repulsive molecules to cutaneous nerve formation in the chick hindlimb

Marcia Honig, Suzanne J. Camilli, Kiran M. Surineni, Brian K. Knight, Holly M. Hardin

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Our previous surgical manipulations have shown that the target ectoderm is necessary for the initial formation of one of the major cutaneous nerves in the embryonic chick limb (Honig, M.G., Camilli, S.J., Xue, Q.S., 2004. Ectoderm removal prevents cutaneous nerve formation and perturbs sensory axon growth in the chick hindlimb. Dev. Biol. 266, 27-42.). Moreover, the target ectoderm is required during a critical time period, at ∼St. 24, when those axons are about to diverge from the hindlimb plexus. To elucidate the underlying mechanisms, here we examined the effects of removing the ectoderm at St. 24 on a variety of molecules expressed within the limb. We find that, while ectoderm removal is accompanied by changes in the expression of Lmx1, fibronectin, EphA7, cDermo-1, and in the complement of muscle cells, these changes do not account for the cutaneous nerve deficit. In contrast, an upregulation of PNA-binding sites and a downregulation of Bmp4 appear to be associated with this nerve deficit. Exogenous BMP4 reversed the effect of ectoderm removal on cutaneous nerve formation, but did not act as a chemoattractant. Our results suggest that BMP4, together with permissive and repulsive molecules that growing cutaneous axons encounter in the local environment and with signaling molecules, originating from and/or dependent on the ectoderm, work in concert to ensure proper cutaneous nerve formation.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)257-273
Number of pages17
JournalDevelopmental Biology
Volume282
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 1 2005

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Ectoderm
Hindlimb
Cues
Skin
Axons
Extremities
Complement C1
Chemotactic Factors
Fibronectins
Muscle Cells
Up-Regulation
Down-Regulation
Binding Sites
Growth

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Molecular Biology
  • Developmental Biology
  • Cell Biology

Cite this

The contributions of BMP4, positive guidance cues, and repulsive molecules to cutaneous nerve formation in the chick hindlimb. / Honig, Marcia; Camilli, Suzanne J.; Surineni, Kiran M.; Knight, Brian K.; Hardin, Holly M.

In: Developmental Biology, Vol. 282, No. 1, 01.06.2005, p. 257-273.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Honig, Marcia ; Camilli, Suzanne J. ; Surineni, Kiran M. ; Knight, Brian K. ; Hardin, Holly M. / The contributions of BMP4, positive guidance cues, and repulsive molecules to cutaneous nerve formation in the chick hindlimb. In: Developmental Biology. 2005 ; Vol. 282, No. 1. pp. 257-273.
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