The 'cost' of medication nonadherence: Consequences we cannot afford to accept

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

43 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: To provide a brief overview of the extent of medication nonadherence in the United States, its impact on patient health and health care costs, its causes, and possible strategies that health care practitioners can use to improve medication adherence. Summary: Medication use and health care costs have increased dramatically during the previous decade in the United States. Adherence to medication therapy often is a critical aspect of medical treatment, particularly the treatment of chronic conditions such as diabetes and hypertension. Despite the importance of adherence, medication nonadherence is a serious problem, with the World Health Organization noting that the average nonadherence rate is 50% among those with chronic illnesses. Consequences of nonadherence include worsening condition, increased comorbid diseases, increased health care costs, and death. Nonadherence results from many causes; therefore, no easy solutions exist. The first step to addressing nonadherence is to recognize that collaboration must occur between health care practitioners and patients to increase adherence, with the goal of achieving optimal health outcomes. Conclusion: The relationship between health care practitioners and patients and open, ongoing communication between the stakeholders are essential to combating medication nonadherence. Given their training and accessibility, pharmacists are well positioned to address nonadherence.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)823-826
Number of pages4
JournalJournal of the American Pharmacists Association
Volume52
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2012

Fingerprint

Medication Adherence
Health care
Costs and Cost Analysis
Health Care Costs
Costs
Delivery of Health Care
Health
Pharmacists
Medical problems
Chronic Disease
Therapeutics
Communication
Hypertension

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Pharmacology (nursing)
  • Pharmacy
  • Pharmacology

Cite this

@article{18ce71c6c0084daaae467ae8cafa5389,
title = "The 'cost' of medication nonadherence: Consequences we cannot afford to accept",
abstract = "Objective: To provide a brief overview of the extent of medication nonadherence in the United States, its impact on patient health and health care costs, its causes, and possible strategies that health care practitioners can use to improve medication adherence. Summary: Medication use and health care costs have increased dramatically during the previous decade in the United States. Adherence to medication therapy often is a critical aspect of medical treatment, particularly the treatment of chronic conditions such as diabetes and hypertension. Despite the importance of adherence, medication nonadherence is a serious problem, with the World Health Organization noting that the average nonadherence rate is 50{\%} among those with chronic illnesses. Consequences of nonadherence include worsening condition, increased comorbid diseases, increased health care costs, and death. Nonadherence results from many causes; therefore, no easy solutions exist. The first step to addressing nonadherence is to recognize that collaboration must occur between health care practitioners and patients to increase adherence, with the goal of achieving optimal health outcomes. Conclusion: The relationship between health care practitioners and patients and open, ongoing communication between the stakeholders are essential to combating medication nonadherence. Given their training and accessibility, pharmacists are well positioned to address nonadherence.",
author = "Marie Chisholm-Burns and Christina Spivey",
year = "2012",
month = "1",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1331/JAPhA.2012.11088",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "52",
pages = "823--826",
journal = "Journal of the American Pharmacists Association : JAPhA",
issn = "1544-3191",
publisher = "American Pharmacists Association",
number = "6",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - The 'cost' of medication nonadherence

T2 - Consequences we cannot afford to accept

AU - Chisholm-Burns, Marie

AU - Spivey, Christina

PY - 2012/1/1

Y1 - 2012/1/1

N2 - Objective: To provide a brief overview of the extent of medication nonadherence in the United States, its impact on patient health and health care costs, its causes, and possible strategies that health care practitioners can use to improve medication adherence. Summary: Medication use and health care costs have increased dramatically during the previous decade in the United States. Adherence to medication therapy often is a critical aspect of medical treatment, particularly the treatment of chronic conditions such as diabetes and hypertension. Despite the importance of adherence, medication nonadherence is a serious problem, with the World Health Organization noting that the average nonadherence rate is 50% among those with chronic illnesses. Consequences of nonadherence include worsening condition, increased comorbid diseases, increased health care costs, and death. Nonadherence results from many causes; therefore, no easy solutions exist. The first step to addressing nonadherence is to recognize that collaboration must occur between health care practitioners and patients to increase adherence, with the goal of achieving optimal health outcomes. Conclusion: The relationship between health care practitioners and patients and open, ongoing communication between the stakeholders are essential to combating medication nonadherence. Given their training and accessibility, pharmacists are well positioned to address nonadherence.

AB - Objective: To provide a brief overview of the extent of medication nonadherence in the United States, its impact on patient health and health care costs, its causes, and possible strategies that health care practitioners can use to improve medication adherence. Summary: Medication use and health care costs have increased dramatically during the previous decade in the United States. Adherence to medication therapy often is a critical aspect of medical treatment, particularly the treatment of chronic conditions such as diabetes and hypertension. Despite the importance of adherence, medication nonadherence is a serious problem, with the World Health Organization noting that the average nonadherence rate is 50% among those with chronic illnesses. Consequences of nonadherence include worsening condition, increased comorbid diseases, increased health care costs, and death. Nonadherence results from many causes; therefore, no easy solutions exist. The first step to addressing nonadherence is to recognize that collaboration must occur between health care practitioners and patients to increase adherence, with the goal of achieving optimal health outcomes. Conclusion: The relationship between health care practitioners and patients and open, ongoing communication between the stakeholders are essential to combating medication nonadherence. Given their training and accessibility, pharmacists are well positioned to address nonadherence.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84879795772&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84879795772&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1331/JAPhA.2012.11088

DO - 10.1331/JAPhA.2012.11088

M3 - Article

C2 - 23229971

AN - SCOPUS:84879795772

VL - 52

SP - 823

EP - 826

JO - Journal of the American Pharmacists Association : JAPhA

JF - Journal of the American Pharmacists Association : JAPhA

SN - 1544-3191

IS - 6

ER -