The development of group A streptococcal vaccines

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Group A streptococci are among the most common causes of bacterial infections in children world-wide. The most devastating and costly global impact of streptococcal pharyngitis is the nonsuppurative complication of acute rheumatic fever (ARF). Economically developed countries of the world have witnessed a significant decline in the incidence of ARF since World War 11, but in underdeveloped countries, ARF remains rampant and is the leading cause of heart disease in children. Prevention programmes based on antibiotic therapy are effective, but the overall results fall far short of what could potentially be achieved using safe, effective and affordable group A streptococcal vaccines. Several vaccine candidates are being developed, but the only vaccines currently in clinical trials are multivalent M protein-based vaccines designed to induce bactericidal antibodies against the most prevalent and/or 'rheumatogenic'serotypes of streptococci. Future vaccines will be designed with the goal of preventing the streptococcal infections that are the primary cause of rheumatic fever around the world.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)4-8
Number of pages5
JournalVaccines: Children and Practice
Volume5
Issue number1
StatePublished - Dec 1 2002

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Streptococcal Vaccines
Rheumatic Fever
Vaccines
Streptococcus
Streptococcal Infections
Pharyngitis
Bacterial Infections
Developed Countries
Heart Diseases
Clinical Trials
Anti-Bacterial Agents
Antibodies
Incidence
Proteins

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health

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The development of group A streptococcal vaccines. / Dale, James.

In: Vaccines: Children and Practice, Vol. 5, No. 1, 01.12.2002, p. 4-8.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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