The development of sensory projection patterns in embryonic chick hindlimb under experimental conditions

Marcia Honig, Cynthia Lance-Jones, Lynn Landmesser

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

47 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

In the chick, sensory neurons grow to their segmentally appropriate target sites in the hindlimb from the outset during normal development. To elucidate the underlying mechanisms, we performed various manipulations of the neural tube, including the neural crest, or of the hindlimb, before axonal outgrowth and assessed the resulting sensory projections using retrograde and anterograde HRP labeling and electrophysiological techniques. Previous experiments had shown that motoneurons are specified to project to their appropriate target muscles prior to axon outgrowth and that they respond to cues in the limb in order to grow to those targets (C. Lance-Jones and L. Landmesser, 1980, J. Physiol. (London), 302, 559-602; C. Lance-Jones and L. Landmesser, 1981, Proc. R. Soc. London, B, 214, 19-52). When several segments of neural tube and neural crest were deleted, sensory neurons in the remaining segments still projected along their correct pathways, as did motoneurons. In situations in which motoneurons grew to their correct targets from altered positions with respect to the limb (e.g., small neural tube reversals), sensory neurons also tended to project along the segmentally appropriate pathways both to skin and to muscle. In situations in which motoneurons were displaced greater distances from their normal point of entry into the limb and made wrong connections (e.g., large neural tube reversals, anterior-posterior limb reversals), sensory neurons also projected incorrectly. The patterns of sensory projections to muscles were, in each situation, generally similar to the motoneuron projections. These results are consistent with the possibility that sensory neurons, like motoneurons, are specified with respect to their peripheral connectivity. Alternatively, the results suggest that motoneurons may play a role in the process of pathway selection by sensory neurons.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)532-548
Number of pages17
JournalDevelopmental Biology
Volume118
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1986

Fingerprint

Motor Neurons
Hindlimb
Sensory Receptor Cells
Neural Tube
Extremities
Neural Crest
Muscles
Cues
Skin

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Molecular Biology
  • Developmental Biology
  • Cell Biology

Cite this

The development of sensory projection patterns in embryonic chick hindlimb under experimental conditions. / Honig, Marcia; Lance-Jones, Cynthia; Landmesser, Lynn.

In: Developmental Biology, Vol. 118, No. 2, 01.01.1986, p. 532-548.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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