The Effect of a Voiced Lip Trill on Estimated Glottal Closed Quotient

Christopher S. Gaskill, Mary Erickson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

34 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Summary: The use of lip trills has been advocated for both vocal habilitation and rehabilitation. A voiced lip trill requires continuous vibration of the lips while simultaneously maintaining phonation. The mechanism of any effects of a lip trill on vocal fold vibration is still unknown. While other techniques that either constrict or artificially lengthen the vocal tract have been investigated, no studies thus far have systematically examined the effect of lip trills on vocal fold vibration. Classically trained singers and vocally untrained participants produced a lip trill for approximately 1 minute, and vocal fold closed quotient (CQ) was calculated both during the lip trill and on a sustained spoken vowel before and after the trill. Data are reported for both a group design and a single-subject design. Most participants showed a tendency for a reduction in CQ during the lip trill, with a more pronounced change in the untrained participants.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)634-643
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of Voice
Volume22
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 1 2008

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Lip
Vocal Cords
Vibration
Rehabilitation
Phonation
Singing

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Otorhinolaryngology
  • Speech and Hearing
  • LPN and LVN

Cite this

The Effect of a Voiced Lip Trill on Estimated Glottal Closed Quotient. / Gaskill, Christopher S.; Erickson, Mary.

In: Journal of Voice, Vol. 22, No. 6, 01.11.2008, p. 634-643.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Gaskill, Christopher S. ; Erickson, Mary. / The Effect of a Voiced Lip Trill on Estimated Glottal Closed Quotient. In: Journal of Voice. 2008 ; Vol. 22, No. 6. pp. 634-643.
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