The effect of benorylate on collagen-induced platelet aggregation

Andrew Kang, Edwin H. Beachey, R. L. Katzman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Benorylate, a new lipid-soluble ester of acety[salicylic acid and N-acetyl-P-aminophenol, which has been reported to cause little or no gastrointestinal bleeding after oral administration and yet to possess an anti-inflammatory effect equal to that of aspirin, was compared with aspirin for its ability to inhibit collagen-induced platelet aggregation. Both benorylate and aspirin, in equimolar doses, inhibit aggregation of human platelets when added in vitro, and after oral administration to rabbits they produce an equal degree of inhibition. It is suggested that the greater gastrointestinal bleeding caused by oral administration of aspirin in contrast to benorylate is, therefore, mediated through a local effect on the gastrointestinal mucosa rather than through interference with platelet function.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)126-128
Number of pages3
JournalScandinavian Journal of Rheumatology
Volume3
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1974

Fingerprint

Platelet Aggregation
Aspirin
Collagen
Oral Administration
Aminophenols
Hemorrhage
Salicylic Acid
Esters
Mucous Membrane
Anti-Inflammatory Agents
Blood Platelets
Rabbits
Lipids
benorilate

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Rheumatology
  • Immunology and Allergy
  • Immunology

Cite this

The effect of benorylate on collagen-induced platelet aggregation. / Kang, Andrew; Beachey, Edwin H.; Katzman, R. L.

In: Scandinavian Journal of Rheumatology, Vol. 3, No. 3, 01.01.1974, p. 126-128.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Kang, Andrew ; Beachey, Edwin H. ; Katzman, R. L. / The effect of benorylate on collagen-induced platelet aggregation. In: Scandinavian Journal of Rheumatology. 1974 ; Vol. 3, No. 3. pp. 126-128.
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