The effect of combined arterial hemodynamics on saphenous venous endothelial nitric oxide production

Patrick J. Casey, Jeffery Dattilo, Guohao Dai, James A. Albert, Olga I. Tsukurov, Roslyn W. Orkin, Jonathan P. Gertler, William M. Abbott

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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    Abstract

    Introduction: Evidence exists that an ideal bypass conduit should have a functional endothelial cell surface combined with mechanical properties similar to those of native arteries. We hypothesized that the effect of combined arterial levels of pulsatile shear stress, flow, and cyclic strain would enhance saphenous venous endothelial cell nitric oxide (NO) production, and that variations in these "ideal" conditions could impair this function. We studied NO production as a measure of endothelial function in response to different hemodynamic conditions. Methods: Human adult saphenous venous endothelial cells were cultured in 10-cm silicone tubes, similar in diameter (5 mm) and compliance (6%) to a medium-caliber peripheral artery (eg, popliteal). Tube cultures were exposed to arterial conditions: a combined pressure (120/80 mm/Hg; mean, 100 mm/Hg), flow (mean, 115 mL/min) and cyclic strain (2%), with a resultant pulsatile shear stress of 4.8 to 9.4 dyne/cm2 (mean, 7.1). Identical tube cultures were used to study variations in these conditions. Modifications of the system included a noncompliant system, a model with nonpulsatile flow, and a final group exposed to pulsatile pressure with no flow. NO levels were measured with a fluorometric nitrite assay of conditioned media collected at 0, 0.25, 0.5, 1, 2, and 4 hours. Experimental groups were compared with cells exposed to nonpulsatile, nonpressurized low flow (shear stress 0.1 dyne/cm2) and static cultures. Results: All experimental groups had greater rates of NO production than cells under static conditions (P < .05). Cells exposed to ideal conditions produced the greatest levels of NO. Independent decreases in compliance, flow, and pul7 satility resulted in significantly lower rates of NO production than those in the group with these conditions intact (vs noncompliant P < .05, vs nonflow P < .05, and vs nonpulsatile P < .05). Conclusions: Our results show that in the absence of physiologically normal pulsatility, cyclic strain, and volume flow, endothelial NO production does not reach the levels seen under ideal conditions. Pulsatile flow and compliance (producing flow with cyclic stretch) play a key role in NO production by vascular endothelium in a three-dimensional hemodynamically active model. This correlates biologically with clinical experience linking graft inflow and runoff and the mechanical properties of the conduit to long-term patency.

    Original languageEnglish (US)
    Pages (from-to)1199-1205
    Number of pages7
    JournalJournal of Vascular Surgery
    Volume33
    Issue number6
    DOIs
    StatePublished - Jan 1 2001

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    Nitric Oxide
    Hemodynamics
    Compliance
    Endothelial Cells
    Pressure
    Pulsatile Flow
    Popliteal Artery
    Vascular Endothelium
    Silicones
    Conditioned Culture Medium
    Nitrites
    Arteries
    Transplants

    All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

    • Surgery
    • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

    Cite this

    Casey, P. J., Dattilo, J., Dai, G., Albert, J. A., Tsukurov, O. I., Orkin, R. W., ... Abbott, W. M. (2001). The effect of combined arterial hemodynamics on saphenous venous endothelial nitric oxide production. Journal of Vascular Surgery, 33(6), 1199-1205. https://doi.org/10.1067/mva.2001.115571

    The effect of combined arterial hemodynamics on saphenous venous endothelial nitric oxide production. / Casey, Patrick J.; Dattilo, Jeffery; Dai, Guohao; Albert, James A.; Tsukurov, Olga I.; Orkin, Roslyn W.; Gertler, Jonathan P.; Abbott, William M.

    In: Journal of Vascular Surgery, Vol. 33, No. 6, 01.01.2001, p. 1199-1205.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    Casey, PJ, Dattilo, J, Dai, G, Albert, JA, Tsukurov, OI, Orkin, RW, Gertler, JP & Abbott, WM 2001, 'The effect of combined arterial hemodynamics on saphenous venous endothelial nitric oxide production', Journal of Vascular Surgery, vol. 33, no. 6, pp. 1199-1205. https://doi.org/10.1067/mva.2001.115571
    Casey, Patrick J. ; Dattilo, Jeffery ; Dai, Guohao ; Albert, James A. ; Tsukurov, Olga I. ; Orkin, Roslyn W. ; Gertler, Jonathan P. ; Abbott, William M. / The effect of combined arterial hemodynamics on saphenous venous endothelial nitric oxide production. In: Journal of Vascular Surgery. 2001 ; Vol. 33, No. 6. pp. 1199-1205.
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    abstract = "Introduction: Evidence exists that an ideal bypass conduit should have a functional endothelial cell surface combined with mechanical properties similar to those of native arteries. We hypothesized that the effect of combined arterial levels of pulsatile shear stress, flow, and cyclic strain would enhance saphenous venous endothelial cell nitric oxide (NO) production, and that variations in these {"}ideal{"} conditions could impair this function. We studied NO production as a measure of endothelial function in response to different hemodynamic conditions. Methods: Human adult saphenous venous endothelial cells were cultured in 10-cm silicone tubes, similar in diameter (5 mm) and compliance (6{\%}) to a medium-caliber peripheral artery (eg, popliteal). Tube cultures were exposed to arterial conditions: a combined pressure (120/80 mm/Hg; mean, 100 mm/Hg), flow (mean, 115 mL/min) and cyclic strain (2{\%}), with a resultant pulsatile shear stress of 4.8 to 9.4 dyne/cm2 (mean, 7.1). Identical tube cultures were used to study variations in these conditions. Modifications of the system included a noncompliant system, a model with nonpulsatile flow, and a final group exposed to pulsatile pressure with no flow. NO levels were measured with a fluorometric nitrite assay of conditioned media collected at 0, 0.25, 0.5, 1, 2, and 4 hours. Experimental groups were compared with cells exposed to nonpulsatile, nonpressurized low flow (shear stress 0.1 dyne/cm2) and static cultures. Results: All experimental groups had greater rates of NO production than cells under static conditions (P < .05). Cells exposed to ideal conditions produced the greatest levels of NO. Independent decreases in compliance, flow, and pul7 satility resulted in significantly lower rates of NO production than those in the group with these conditions intact (vs noncompliant P < .05, vs nonflow P < .05, and vs nonpulsatile P < .05). Conclusions: Our results show that in the absence of physiologically normal pulsatility, cyclic strain, and volume flow, endothelial NO production does not reach the levels seen under ideal conditions. Pulsatile flow and compliance (producing flow with cyclic stretch) play a key role in NO production by vascular endothelium in a three-dimensional hemodynamically active model. This correlates biologically with clinical experience linking graft inflow and runoff and the mechanical properties of the conduit to long-term patency.",
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    T1 - The effect of combined arterial hemodynamics on saphenous venous endothelial nitric oxide production

    AU - Casey, Patrick J.

    AU - Dattilo, Jeffery

    AU - Dai, Guohao

    AU - Albert, James A.

    AU - Tsukurov, Olga I.

    AU - Orkin, Roslyn W.

    AU - Gertler, Jonathan P.

    AU - Abbott, William M.

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    N2 - Introduction: Evidence exists that an ideal bypass conduit should have a functional endothelial cell surface combined with mechanical properties similar to those of native arteries. We hypothesized that the effect of combined arterial levels of pulsatile shear stress, flow, and cyclic strain would enhance saphenous venous endothelial cell nitric oxide (NO) production, and that variations in these "ideal" conditions could impair this function. We studied NO production as a measure of endothelial function in response to different hemodynamic conditions. Methods: Human adult saphenous venous endothelial cells were cultured in 10-cm silicone tubes, similar in diameter (5 mm) and compliance (6%) to a medium-caliber peripheral artery (eg, popliteal). Tube cultures were exposed to arterial conditions: a combined pressure (120/80 mm/Hg; mean, 100 mm/Hg), flow (mean, 115 mL/min) and cyclic strain (2%), with a resultant pulsatile shear stress of 4.8 to 9.4 dyne/cm2 (mean, 7.1). Identical tube cultures were used to study variations in these conditions. Modifications of the system included a noncompliant system, a model with nonpulsatile flow, and a final group exposed to pulsatile pressure with no flow. NO levels were measured with a fluorometric nitrite assay of conditioned media collected at 0, 0.25, 0.5, 1, 2, and 4 hours. Experimental groups were compared with cells exposed to nonpulsatile, nonpressurized low flow (shear stress 0.1 dyne/cm2) and static cultures. Results: All experimental groups had greater rates of NO production than cells under static conditions (P < .05). Cells exposed to ideal conditions produced the greatest levels of NO. Independent decreases in compliance, flow, and pul7 satility resulted in significantly lower rates of NO production than those in the group with these conditions intact (vs noncompliant P < .05, vs nonflow P < .05, and vs nonpulsatile P < .05). Conclusions: Our results show that in the absence of physiologically normal pulsatility, cyclic strain, and volume flow, endothelial NO production does not reach the levels seen under ideal conditions. Pulsatile flow and compliance (producing flow with cyclic stretch) play a key role in NO production by vascular endothelium in a three-dimensional hemodynamically active model. This correlates biologically with clinical experience linking graft inflow and runoff and the mechanical properties of the conduit to long-term patency.

    AB - Introduction: Evidence exists that an ideal bypass conduit should have a functional endothelial cell surface combined with mechanical properties similar to those of native arteries. We hypothesized that the effect of combined arterial levels of pulsatile shear stress, flow, and cyclic strain would enhance saphenous venous endothelial cell nitric oxide (NO) production, and that variations in these "ideal" conditions could impair this function. We studied NO production as a measure of endothelial function in response to different hemodynamic conditions. Methods: Human adult saphenous venous endothelial cells were cultured in 10-cm silicone tubes, similar in diameter (5 mm) and compliance (6%) to a medium-caliber peripheral artery (eg, popliteal). Tube cultures were exposed to arterial conditions: a combined pressure (120/80 mm/Hg; mean, 100 mm/Hg), flow (mean, 115 mL/min) and cyclic strain (2%), with a resultant pulsatile shear stress of 4.8 to 9.4 dyne/cm2 (mean, 7.1). Identical tube cultures were used to study variations in these conditions. Modifications of the system included a noncompliant system, a model with nonpulsatile flow, and a final group exposed to pulsatile pressure with no flow. NO levels were measured with a fluorometric nitrite assay of conditioned media collected at 0, 0.25, 0.5, 1, 2, and 4 hours. Experimental groups were compared with cells exposed to nonpulsatile, nonpressurized low flow (shear stress 0.1 dyne/cm2) and static cultures. Results: All experimental groups had greater rates of NO production than cells under static conditions (P < .05). Cells exposed to ideal conditions produced the greatest levels of NO. Independent decreases in compliance, flow, and pul7 satility resulted in significantly lower rates of NO production than those in the group with these conditions intact (vs noncompliant P < .05, vs nonflow P < .05, and vs nonpulsatile P < .05). Conclusions: Our results show that in the absence of physiologically normal pulsatility, cyclic strain, and volume flow, endothelial NO production does not reach the levels seen under ideal conditions. Pulsatile flow and compliance (producing flow with cyclic stretch) play a key role in NO production by vascular endothelium in a three-dimensional hemodynamically active model. This correlates biologically with clinical experience linking graft inflow and runoff and the mechanical properties of the conduit to long-term patency.

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