The effect of improving communication competency on the certifying examination of the American board of surgery

Pamela Rowland, Nicholas P. Coe, A. Gerson Greenburg, Richard K. Spence, William P. Reed, Nicholas P. Lang, Parvis J. Sadighi, Kenneth W. Burchard

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

10 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Since 1991 the authors have offered a course that identifies content deficits, but only provides instruction directed at improving verbal and nonverbal behaviors. We report the outcome of this 10-year effort as success on the certifying examination of the American Board of Surgery between 1991 and 2001. Methods: Sixteen 5-day courses were scheduled over 10 years. Participants included those who had not taken the oral examination or had failed at least once and invited senior faculty (n = 26). Sites were chosen to replicate the actual examination setting. Results: There were 122 participants, with follow-up data available on 88. Success in the certifying examination after completing the course is 96 percent. Conclusions: Evaluation of communication deficits and training to improve them is strongly associated with success. Clearly, this course is effective at identifying communication behaviors that are interfering with success on the certifying examination of the American Board of Surgery.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)655-658
Number of pages4
JournalAmerican Journal of Surgery
Volume183
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 15 2002

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Communication
Verbal Behavior
Oral Diagnosis

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Surgery

Cite this

Rowland, P., Coe, N. P., Greenburg, A. G., Spence, R. K., Reed, W. P., Lang, N. P., ... Burchard, K. W. (2002). The effect of improving communication competency on the certifying examination of the American board of surgery. American Journal of Surgery, 183(6), 655-658. https://doi.org/10.1016/S0002-9610(02)00861-9

The effect of improving communication competency on the certifying examination of the American board of surgery. / Rowland, Pamela; Coe, Nicholas P.; Greenburg, A. Gerson; Spence, Richard K.; Reed, William P.; Lang, Nicholas P.; Sadighi, Parvis J.; Burchard, Kenneth W.

In: American Journal of Surgery, Vol. 183, No. 6, 15.07.2002, p. 655-658.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Rowland, P, Coe, NP, Greenburg, AG, Spence, RK, Reed, WP, Lang, NP, Sadighi, PJ & Burchard, KW 2002, 'The effect of improving communication competency on the certifying examination of the American board of surgery', American Journal of Surgery, vol. 183, no. 6, pp. 655-658. https://doi.org/10.1016/S0002-9610(02)00861-9
Rowland, Pamela ; Coe, Nicholas P. ; Greenburg, A. Gerson ; Spence, Richard K. ; Reed, William P. ; Lang, Nicholas P. ; Sadighi, Parvis J. ; Burchard, Kenneth W. / The effect of improving communication competency on the certifying examination of the American board of surgery. In: American Journal of Surgery. 2002 ; Vol. 183, No. 6. pp. 655-658.
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