The effect of increasing levels of fish oil-containing structured triglycerides on protein metabolism in parenterally fed rats stressed by burn plus endotoxin

C. J. Gollaher, K. Fechner, Michael Karlstad, V. K. Babayan, B. R. Bistrian

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

16 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This report investigates the effect of various levels of medium- chain/fish oil structured triglycerides on protein and energy metabolism in hypermetabolic rats. Male Sprague-Dawley rats (192 to 226 g) were continuously infused with isovolemic diets that provided 200 kcal/kg per day and 2 g of amino acid nitrogen per kilogram per day. The percentage of nonnitrogen calories as structured triglyceride was varied: no fat, 5%, 15%, or 30%. A 30% long-chain triglyceride diet was also provided as a control to compare the protein-sparing abilities of these two types of fat. Nitrogen excretion, plasma albumin, plasma triglycerides, and whole-body and liver and muscle protein kinetics were determined after 3 days of feeding. Whole-body protein breakdown, flux, and oxidation were similar in all groups. The 15% structured triglyceride diet maximized whole-body protein synthesis (p < .05). Liver fractional synthetic rate was significantly greater in animals receiving 5% of nonprotein calories as structured triglyceride (p < .05). Muscle fractional synthetic rate was unchanged. Plasma triglycerides were markedly elevated in the 30% structured triglyceride-fed rats. The 30% structured triglyceride diet maintained plasma albumin levels better than those diets containing no fat, 5% medium-chain triglyceride/fish oil structured triglycerides, or 30% long-chain triglycerides. Nitrogen excretion was lower in animals receiving 30% of nonnitrogen calories as a structured triglyceride than in those receiving 30% as long-chain triglycerides, but this difference did not reach statistical significance (p = .1). These data suggest that protein metabolism is optimized when structured triglyceride is provided at relatively low dietary fat intakes.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)247-253
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition
Volume17
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1993
Externally publishedYes

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Fish Oils
Endotoxins
Triglycerides
Proteins
Diet
Nitrogen
Fats
Serum Albumin
Muscle Proteins
Dietary Fats
Liver
Energy Metabolism
Sprague Dawley Rats

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Nutrition and Dietetics

Cite this

The effect of increasing levels of fish oil-containing structured triglycerides on protein metabolism in parenterally fed rats stressed by burn plus endotoxin. / Gollaher, C. J.; Fechner, K.; Karlstad, Michael; Babayan, V. K.; Bistrian, B. R.

In: Journal of Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition, Vol. 17, No. 3, 01.01.1993, p. 247-253.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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