The effect of magnification on student performance in pediatric operative dentistry.

Martin Donaldson, G. W. Knight, P. J. Guenzel

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

10 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Previous research has shown that accurate student self-evaluation is related to higher quality dental products. Variance in student performance still remains. Enhancement of visual perception could contribute to product improvement. Only one study has evaluated the effects of magnification on simulated dental patient care. The present study sought to determine if magnification had a positive effect on student-generated products in pediatric amalgam preparations. Fifty-two third-year students were randomly assigned to experimental (magnification) or control (no magnification) groups. Members of the experimental group used magnification in their daily work in the pediatric dentistry clinic. No significant differences between the groups' preparations or evaluations of standard preparations were found. Further study should address these issues: 1) possible effects of specific training in the use of magnification devices; 2) whether the tolerance for error in dental preparations is so great that finer vision contributes little to product improvement; 3) the role of tactile sensation in evaluation and preparation; and 4) the possible benefits of magnification for effect of age. Based on this study, it seems that requiring students to purchase magnification devices may not be justified.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)905-910
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Dental Education
Volume62
Issue number11
StatePublished - Jan 1 1998
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Operative Dentistry
Pediatric Dentistry
dentistry
Students
performance
student
evaluation
Tooth Preparation
Equipment and Supplies
visual perception
Diagnostic Self Evaluation
Visual Perception
Dental Care
Group
Touch
patient care
tolerance
purchase
Patient Care
Tooth

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Education
  • Dentistry(all)

Cite this

The effect of magnification on student performance in pediatric operative dentistry. / Donaldson, Martin; Knight, G. W.; Guenzel, P. J.

In: Journal of Dental Education, Vol. 62, No. 11, 01.01.1998, p. 905-910.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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