The effect varied scanning electron microscopy desiccation techniques has on demineralized dentin

John D. Sterrett, Murray Marks, John Dunlap, Jerilyn Swann, Montana Dunn

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The study objective was to assess (a) the effect of a rubbing-application of ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) or citric acid (CA) has on the ultrastructure of surface dentin and (b) the effect of two scanning electron microscopy (SEM) desiccation preparation techniques have on the collagen surface produced. Treatment regions on proximal root surfaces of extracted human teeth were root planned to expose dentin. Cotton pellets soaked in either 30% CA or 24% EDTA solution were rubbed on the treatment region then processed for SEM using one of two desiccation techniques, that is, (a) critically point dried from liquid CO2 (control) or (b) air-dried from tetramethylsilane (experimental). Specimens were coated with gold/palladium and viewed/photographed with an SEM. Specimens of the control groups displayed tufted fibrils (CA > EDTA) with many dentin tubules being partially obscured by overhanging fibrils. Air-dried specimens of both treatment groups displayed a flat intact monolayer devoid of a matted meshwork of fibrous collagen. Discrete fibril “sprigs,” emanating from the surface monolayer, were characteristic of the EDTA group only. The rubbing-application of EDTA on dentin produces a tufted fibril surface somewhat similar to that produced by CA. Air-drying desiccation of both resulted in marked distortion with fibril collapse/coalescence of the tufted collagen matrix.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1249-1255
Number of pages7
JournalMicroscopy Research and Technique
Volume82
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 1 2019

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Desiccation
ethylenediaminetetraacetic acids
Ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid
Dentin
Edetic Acid
Electron Scanning Microscopy
citric acid
drying
Citric acid
Citric Acid
collagens
Scanning electron microscopy
scanning electron microscopy
Collagen
Air
Monolayers
air
Tooth Root
cotton
Palladium

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Anatomy
  • Histology
  • Instrumentation
  • Medical Laboratory Technology

Cite this

The effect varied scanning electron microscopy desiccation techniques has on demineralized dentin. / Sterrett, John D.; Marks, Murray; Dunlap, John; Swann, Jerilyn; Dunn, Montana.

In: Microscopy Research and Technique, Vol. 82, No. 8, 01.08.2019, p. 1249-1255.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Sterrett, John D. ; Marks, Murray ; Dunlap, John ; Swann, Jerilyn ; Dunn, Montana. / The effect varied scanning electron microscopy desiccation techniques has on demineralized dentin. In: Microscopy Research and Technique. 2019 ; Vol. 82, No. 8. pp. 1249-1255.
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