The effects of extensive forebrain lesions on visual discriminative performance in turtles (Chrysemys picta picta)

Anton Reiner, Alice Schade Powers

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

10 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Though anatomical research has demonstrated major ascending telencephalically directed visual channels in reptiles, little behavioral research has examined reptilian forebrain visual functions. The present study reports the effects of extensive forebrain lesions, involving either severe destruction of dorsal thalamus or disruption of the fibers of the lateral forebrain bundle (by lesions of the basolateral telencephalon), upon visual discriminative performance in the turtle. Such lesions, which extensively damage the ascending visual pathways, rendered turtles incapable of relearning preoperatively acquired visual discriminative problems. The magnitude of the visual impairments observed following such forebrain lesions suggest a major role on the part of the forebrain in visual processing in reptiles.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)327-337
Number of pages11
JournalBrain Research
Volume192
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 23 1980
Externally publishedYes

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Turtles
Prosencephalon
Reptiles
Behavioral Research
Telencephalon
Visual Pathways
Vision Disorders
Thalamus
Research

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Neuroscience(all)
  • Molecular Biology
  • Developmental Biology
  • Clinical Neurology

Cite this

The effects of extensive forebrain lesions on visual discriminative performance in turtles (Chrysemys picta picta). / Reiner, Anton; Powers, Alice Schade.

In: Brain Research, Vol. 192, No. 2, 23.06.1980, p. 327-337.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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