The effects of fluency enhancing conditions on sensorimotor control of speech in typically fluent speakers

An EEG mu rhythm study

Tiffani Kittilstved, Kevin Reilly, Ashley Harkrider, Devin Casenhiser, David Thornton, David E. Jenson, Tricia Hedinger, Andrew L. Bowers, Tim Saltuklaroglu

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: To determine whether changes in sensorimotor control resulting from speaking conditions that induce fluency in people who stutter (PWS) can be measured using electroencephalographic (EEG) mu rhythms in neurotypical speakers. Methods: Non-stuttering (NS) adults spoke in one control condition (solo speaking) and four experimental conditions (choral speech, delayed auditory feedback (DAF), prolonged speech and pseudostuttering). Independent component analysis (ICA) was used to identify sensorimotor m components from EEG recordings. Time-frequency analyses measured m-alpha (8-13 Hz) and m-beta (15-25 Hz) event-related synchronization (ERS) and desynchronization (ERD) during each speech condition. Results: 19/24 participants contributed m components. Relative to the control condition, the choral and DAF conditions elicited increases in m-alpha ERD in the right hemisphere. In the pseudostuttering condition, increases in m-beta ERD were observed in the left hemisphere. No differences were present between the prolonged speech and control conditions. Conclusions: Differences observed in the experimental conditions are thought to reflect sensorimotor control changes. Increases in right hemisphere m-alpha ERD likely reflect increased reliance on auditory information, including auditory feedback, during the choral and DAF conditions. In the left hemisphere, increases in m-beta ERD during pseudostuttering may have resulted from the different movement characteristics of this task compared with the solo speaking task. Relationships to findings in stuttering are discussed. Significance: Changes in sensorimotor control related feedforward and feedback control in fluency-enhancing speech manipulations can be measured using time-frequency decompositions of EEG m rhythms in neurotypical speakers. This quiet, non-invasive, and temporally sensitive technique may be applied to learn more about normal sensorimotor control and fluency enhancement in PWS.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number126
JournalFrontiers in Human Neuroscience
Volume12
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 4 2018

Fingerprint

Stuttering

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Neuropsychology and Physiological Psychology
  • Neurology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Biological Psychiatry
  • Behavioral Neuroscience

Cite this

@article{b042a211dfd14d13bb062ca819e72b38,
title = "The effects of fluency enhancing conditions on sensorimotor control of speech in typically fluent speakers: An EEG mu rhythm study",
abstract = "Objective: To determine whether changes in sensorimotor control resulting from speaking conditions that induce fluency in people who stutter (PWS) can be measured using electroencephalographic (EEG) mu rhythms in neurotypical speakers. Methods: Non-stuttering (NS) adults spoke in one control condition (solo speaking) and four experimental conditions (choral speech, delayed auditory feedback (DAF), prolonged speech and pseudostuttering). Independent component analysis (ICA) was used to identify sensorimotor m components from EEG recordings. Time-frequency analyses measured m-alpha (8-13 Hz) and m-beta (15-25 Hz) event-related synchronization (ERS) and desynchronization (ERD) during each speech condition. Results: 19/24 participants contributed m components. Relative to the control condition, the choral and DAF conditions elicited increases in m-alpha ERD in the right hemisphere. In the pseudostuttering condition, increases in m-beta ERD were observed in the left hemisphere. No differences were present between the prolonged speech and control conditions. Conclusions: Differences observed in the experimental conditions are thought to reflect sensorimotor control changes. Increases in right hemisphere m-alpha ERD likely reflect increased reliance on auditory information, including auditory feedback, during the choral and DAF conditions. In the left hemisphere, increases in m-beta ERD during pseudostuttering may have resulted from the different movement characteristics of this task compared with the solo speaking task. Relationships to findings in stuttering are discussed. Significance: Changes in sensorimotor control related feedforward and feedback control in fluency-enhancing speech manipulations can be measured using time-frequency decompositions of EEG m rhythms in neurotypical speakers. This quiet, non-invasive, and temporally sensitive technique may be applied to learn more about normal sensorimotor control and fluency enhancement in PWS.",
author = "Tiffani Kittilstved and Kevin Reilly and Ashley Harkrider and Devin Casenhiser and David Thornton and Jenson, {David E.} and Tricia Hedinger and Bowers, {Andrew L.} and Tim Saltuklaroglu",
year = "2018",
month = "4",
day = "4",
doi = "10.3389/fnhum.2018.00126",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "12",
journal = "Frontiers in Human Neuroscience",
issn = "1662-5161",
publisher = "Frontiers Research Foundation",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - The effects of fluency enhancing conditions on sensorimotor control of speech in typically fluent speakers

T2 - An EEG mu rhythm study

AU - Kittilstved, Tiffani

AU - Reilly, Kevin

AU - Harkrider, Ashley

AU - Casenhiser, Devin

AU - Thornton, David

AU - Jenson, David E.

AU - Hedinger, Tricia

AU - Bowers, Andrew L.

AU - Saltuklaroglu, Tim

PY - 2018/4/4

Y1 - 2018/4/4

N2 - Objective: To determine whether changes in sensorimotor control resulting from speaking conditions that induce fluency in people who stutter (PWS) can be measured using electroencephalographic (EEG) mu rhythms in neurotypical speakers. Methods: Non-stuttering (NS) adults spoke in one control condition (solo speaking) and four experimental conditions (choral speech, delayed auditory feedback (DAF), prolonged speech and pseudostuttering). Independent component analysis (ICA) was used to identify sensorimotor m components from EEG recordings. Time-frequency analyses measured m-alpha (8-13 Hz) and m-beta (15-25 Hz) event-related synchronization (ERS) and desynchronization (ERD) during each speech condition. Results: 19/24 participants contributed m components. Relative to the control condition, the choral and DAF conditions elicited increases in m-alpha ERD in the right hemisphere. In the pseudostuttering condition, increases in m-beta ERD were observed in the left hemisphere. No differences were present between the prolonged speech and control conditions. Conclusions: Differences observed in the experimental conditions are thought to reflect sensorimotor control changes. Increases in right hemisphere m-alpha ERD likely reflect increased reliance on auditory information, including auditory feedback, during the choral and DAF conditions. In the left hemisphere, increases in m-beta ERD during pseudostuttering may have resulted from the different movement characteristics of this task compared with the solo speaking task. Relationships to findings in stuttering are discussed. Significance: Changes in sensorimotor control related feedforward and feedback control in fluency-enhancing speech manipulations can be measured using time-frequency decompositions of EEG m rhythms in neurotypical speakers. This quiet, non-invasive, and temporally sensitive technique may be applied to learn more about normal sensorimotor control and fluency enhancement in PWS.

AB - Objective: To determine whether changes in sensorimotor control resulting from speaking conditions that induce fluency in people who stutter (PWS) can be measured using electroencephalographic (EEG) mu rhythms in neurotypical speakers. Methods: Non-stuttering (NS) adults spoke in one control condition (solo speaking) and four experimental conditions (choral speech, delayed auditory feedback (DAF), prolonged speech and pseudostuttering). Independent component analysis (ICA) was used to identify sensorimotor m components from EEG recordings. Time-frequency analyses measured m-alpha (8-13 Hz) and m-beta (15-25 Hz) event-related synchronization (ERS) and desynchronization (ERD) during each speech condition. Results: 19/24 participants contributed m components. Relative to the control condition, the choral and DAF conditions elicited increases in m-alpha ERD in the right hemisphere. In the pseudostuttering condition, increases in m-beta ERD were observed in the left hemisphere. No differences were present between the prolonged speech and control conditions. Conclusions: Differences observed in the experimental conditions are thought to reflect sensorimotor control changes. Increases in right hemisphere m-alpha ERD likely reflect increased reliance on auditory information, including auditory feedback, during the choral and DAF conditions. In the left hemisphere, increases in m-beta ERD during pseudostuttering may have resulted from the different movement characteristics of this task compared with the solo speaking task. Relationships to findings in stuttering are discussed. Significance: Changes in sensorimotor control related feedforward and feedback control in fluency-enhancing speech manipulations can be measured using time-frequency decompositions of EEG m rhythms in neurotypical speakers. This quiet, non-invasive, and temporally sensitive technique may be applied to learn more about normal sensorimotor control and fluency enhancement in PWS.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85046901405&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=85046901405&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.3389/fnhum.2018.00126

DO - 10.3389/fnhum.2018.00126

M3 - Article

VL - 12

JO - Frontiers in Human Neuroscience

JF - Frontiers in Human Neuroscience

SN - 1662-5161

M1 - 126

ER -