The effects of high-frequency amplification on the objective and subjective performance of hearing instrument users with varying degrees of high-frequency hearing loss

Patrick Plyler, Erica L. Fleck

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

28 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Purpose: The purpose of the present study was to determine if amplifying beyond 2 kHz affected the objective and subjective performance of hearing instrument users with varying degrees of mild-to-severe high-frequency sensorineural hearing loss. Method: Twenty participants were fitted binaurally with digital completely-in-the-canal devices with 4-channel wide dynamic range compression (Starkey Axent). Each participant used the hearing instruments for two 6-week trial periods. Each hearing instrument was programmed to maximize high-frequency audibility during 1 trial period and minimize high-frequency audibility during the other trial period. Objective evaluations were conducted in quiet using the Connected Speech Test (CST) and in noise using the CST and the Hearing in Noise Test. Subjective performance was evaluated by administering the Abbreviated Profile of Hearing Aid Benefit and a questionnaire. Results: Results indicated that high-frequency amplification significantly improved objective performance in noise and subjective preference in quiet for listeners with varying degrees of mild-to-severe high-frequency hearing loss. Results also suggested that high-frequency amplification may affect subjective preference in noise and overall for listeners with varying degrees of mild-to-severe high-frequency hearing loss when feedback is eliminated. Conclusion: Based on these significant benefits, dispensers should be aware that high-frequency amplification should, at least initially, be provided to the affected high-frequency regions when mild-to-severe hearing loss is present.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)616-627
Number of pages12
JournalJournal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research
Volume49
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2006

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High-Frequency Hearing Loss
Hearing
Noise
listener
performance
Hearing Tests
Hearing Aids
Sensorineural Hearing Loss
Hearing Loss
Equipment and Supplies
Amplification
Hearing Impairment
questionnaire
evaluation

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Language and Linguistics
  • Linguistics and Language
  • Speech and Hearing

Cite this

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abstract = "Purpose: The purpose of the present study was to determine if amplifying beyond 2 kHz affected the objective and subjective performance of hearing instrument users with varying degrees of mild-to-severe high-frequency sensorineural hearing loss. Method: Twenty participants were fitted binaurally with digital completely-in-the-canal devices with 4-channel wide dynamic range compression (Starkey Axent). Each participant used the hearing instruments for two 6-week trial periods. Each hearing instrument was programmed to maximize high-frequency audibility during 1 trial period and minimize high-frequency audibility during the other trial period. Objective evaluations were conducted in quiet using the Connected Speech Test (CST) and in noise using the CST and the Hearing in Noise Test. Subjective performance was evaluated by administering the Abbreviated Profile of Hearing Aid Benefit and a questionnaire. Results: Results indicated that high-frequency amplification significantly improved objective performance in noise and subjective preference in quiet for listeners with varying degrees of mild-to-severe high-frequency hearing loss. Results also suggested that high-frequency amplification may affect subjective preference in noise and overall for listeners with varying degrees of mild-to-severe high-frequency hearing loss when feedback is eliminated. Conclusion: Based on these significant benefits, dispensers should be aware that high-frequency amplification should, at least initially, be provided to the affected high-frequency regions when mild-to-severe hearing loss is present.",
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