The effects of smoking cessation and gender on dietary intake, physical activity, and weight gain

Robert Klesges, Linda H. Eck, Eddie M. Clark, Andrew W. Meyers, Cindy L. Hanson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

9 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This investigation evaluated the impact of smoking cessation and sex on changes in dietary intake, physical activity, and weight gain in young adults who did not intend to maintain their cessation. Subjects were 68 smokers and nonsmokers (30 males, 38 females) who participated in a 3‐week study. During the investigation, all subjects' dietary intakes, physical activities, and body weights were carefully monitored. At the end of the first week, smokers were told that they could earn money if they stopped smoking for 1 week. Of the 47 smokers, 17 (36%) succeeded in not smoking for the 1‐week period (confirmed by carbon monoxide [CO] analyses). Those who quit were then allowed to resume smoking during the third week (all resumed smoking). Results indicated that smokers who quit for 1 week did not gain a significant amount of weight but weight did change relative to nonsmokers' and nonquitters' weights. No changes were observed for males who quit smoking. There was evidence that females who quit smoking were dieting during the cessation period in that they increased their consumption of monosaturated and polyunsaturated fats during the 1‐week cessation period while males who quit did not change their dietary intake. No changes in physical activity were noted in either males or females as a result of smoking cessation. The role of sex and changes in dietary intake and their effects on body weight are discussed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)435-445
Number of pages11
JournalInternational Journal of Eating Disorders
Volume9
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1990

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Smoking Cessation
Weight Gain
Smoking
Exercise
Weights and Measures
Body Weight
Carbon Monoxide
Young Adult
Fats

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Cite this

The effects of smoking cessation and gender on dietary intake, physical activity, and weight gain. / Klesges, Robert; Eck, Linda H.; Clark, Eddie M.; Meyers, Andrew W.; Hanson, Cindy L.

In: International Journal of Eating Disorders, Vol. 9, No. 4, 01.01.1990, p. 435-445.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Klesges, Robert ; Eck, Linda H. ; Clark, Eddie M. ; Meyers, Andrew W. ; Hanson, Cindy L. / The effects of smoking cessation and gender on dietary intake, physical activity, and weight gain. In: International Journal of Eating Disorders. 1990 ; Vol. 9, No. 4. pp. 435-445.
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