The effects of visual distracter complexity on auditory evoked p3b in contact sports athletes

Matthew J. Wilson, Ashley Harkrider, Kristin A. King

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

"Classic" P3b auditory oddball paradigms are insensitive to subtle deficits. An auditory oddball paradigm paired with visual distracters was used to compare football players with history of concussion, football players without history of concussion, and non-contact sport athletes. As hypothesized, increasing complexity of, and attention to, visual distracters reduced P3b amplitude. P3b amplitudes from non-contact athletes were larger than those from football players; however, players with and without a history of concussion were not significantly different. An auditory oddball paradigm with simple visual distracter improves sensitivity to cognitive deficits. Subconcussive impacts may contribute to brain damage frequently attributed to concussions.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)113-130
Number of pages18
JournalDevelopmental Neuropsychology
Volume39
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 17 2014

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Football
Athletes
Sports
Brain

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Neuropsychology and Physiological Psychology
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology

Cite this

The effects of visual distracter complexity on auditory evoked p3b in contact sports athletes. / Wilson, Matthew J.; Harkrider, Ashley; King, Kristin A.

In: Developmental Neuropsychology, Vol. 39, No. 2, 17.02.2014, p. 113-130.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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