The Efficacy of Systemic Doxycycline Administration as an Inhibitor of Intimal Hyperplasia after Balloon Angioplasty Arterial Injury

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background: Intimal hyperplasia (IH) is the most common indicator for secondary intervention in peripheral vascular disease. Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) play a role in IH development due to their degradation of the extracellular matrix. Doxycycline (Doxy), a member of the tetracycline family of antibiotics, is a potent MMP inhibitor. We have previously shown that Doxy inhibits MMP activity and vascular smooth muscle cell migration in vitro. We hypothesized that Doxy would decrease MMP activity in vivo and inhibit the development of IH in a rodent model of vascular injury. Methods and Results: Doxy (400 mg/pellet) was delivered by a slow-release pellet implanted 3 days prior to or at the time of balloon angioplasty (BA) of the common carotid artery in female rats. At 14 days post-BA, intima-to-media (I:M) ratios were 0.77 ± 0.21 and 1.04 ± 0.32 in the Doxy treated groups, respectively, compared to 1.25 ± 0.26 in the control group (P = not significant; n = 3). Additionally, the tested dose of Doxy in either group had no inhibitory effect on membrane type 1-MMP or MMP-2 tissue levels, as measured by immunohistochemistry, or on systemic levels of MMP, as measured by total MMP serum levels using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. At 14 days post-BA, VSMC proliferation in the injured artery was increased to Doxy treatment prior to and at the time of surgery (23.5 ± 3.4 and 27.2 ± 3.9%, respectively), compared to control (11.4 ± 0.4%; n = 3), as measured by proliferating cellular nuclear antigen immunostaining. Conclusions: In our in vivo model of vascular injury, systemic Doxy administration prior to or at the time of vascular injury does not significantly hinder the progression of IH development. Additional doses and routes of administration could be examined in order to correlate therapeutic serum levels of Doxy with effective MMP inhibition in serum and arterial tissue. However, alternative drug delivery systems are needed in order to optimize therapeutic administration of targeted MMP inhibitors for the prevention of IH development.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)201-209
Number of pages9
JournalAnnals of Vascular Surgery
Volume57
DOIs
StatePublished - May 1 2019

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Tunica Intima
Balloon Angioplasty
Doxycycline
Hyperplasia
Matrix Metalloproteinases
Wounds and Injuries
Vascular System Injuries
Matrix Metalloproteinase Inhibitors
Serum
Matrix Metalloproteinase 14
Nuclear Antigens
Peripheral Vascular Diseases
Common Carotid Artery
Matrix Metalloproteinase 2
Drug Delivery Systems
Tetracycline
Vascular Smooth Muscle
Smooth Muscle Myocytes
Cell Movement
Extracellular Matrix

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Surgery
  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

Cite this

@article{9326f6348c284053bfb6784be18f673c,
title = "The Efficacy of Systemic Doxycycline Administration as an Inhibitor of Intimal Hyperplasia after Balloon Angioplasty Arterial Injury",
abstract = "Background: Intimal hyperplasia (IH) is the most common indicator for secondary intervention in peripheral vascular disease. Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) play a role in IH development due to their degradation of the extracellular matrix. Doxycycline (Doxy), a member of the tetracycline family of antibiotics, is a potent MMP inhibitor. We have previously shown that Doxy inhibits MMP activity and vascular smooth muscle cell migration in vitro. We hypothesized that Doxy would decrease MMP activity in vivo and inhibit the development of IH in a rodent model of vascular injury. Methods and Results: Doxy (400 mg/pellet) was delivered by a slow-release pellet implanted 3 days prior to or at the time of balloon angioplasty (BA) of the common carotid artery in female rats. At 14 days post-BA, intima-to-media (I:M) ratios were 0.77 ± 0.21 and 1.04 ± 0.32 in the Doxy treated groups, respectively, compared to 1.25 ± 0.26 in the control group (P = not significant; n = 3). Additionally, the tested dose of Doxy in either group had no inhibitory effect on membrane type 1-MMP or MMP-2 tissue levels, as measured by immunohistochemistry, or on systemic levels of MMP, as measured by total MMP serum levels using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. At 14 days post-BA, VSMC proliferation in the injured artery was increased to Doxy treatment prior to and at the time of surgery (23.5 ± 3.4 and 27.2 ± 3.9{\%}, respectively), compared to control (11.4 ± 0.4{\%}; n = 3), as measured by proliferating cellular nuclear antigen immunostaining. Conclusions: In our in vivo model of vascular injury, systemic Doxy administration prior to or at the time of vascular injury does not significantly hinder the progression of IH development. Additional doses and routes of administration could be examined in order to correlate therapeutic serum levels of Doxy with effective MMP inhibition in serum and arterial tissue. However, alternative drug delivery systems are needed in order to optimize therapeutic administration of targeted MMP inhibitors for the prevention of IH development.",
author = "Deidra Mountain and Kirkpatrick, {Stacy S.} and Joshua Arnold and Buckley, {M. Ryan} and Michael Mcnally and Scott Stevens and Michael Freeman and Oscar Grandas",
year = "2019",
month = "5",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1016/j.avsg.2018.11.005",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "57",
pages = "201--209",
journal = "Annals of Vascular Surgery",
issn = "0890-5096",
publisher = "Elsevier Inc.",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - The Efficacy of Systemic Doxycycline Administration as an Inhibitor of Intimal Hyperplasia after Balloon Angioplasty Arterial Injury

AU - Mountain, Deidra

AU - Kirkpatrick, Stacy S.

AU - Arnold, Joshua

AU - Buckley, M. Ryan

AU - Mcnally, Michael

AU - Stevens, Scott

AU - Freeman, Michael

AU - Grandas, Oscar

PY - 2019/5/1

Y1 - 2019/5/1

N2 - Background: Intimal hyperplasia (IH) is the most common indicator for secondary intervention in peripheral vascular disease. Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) play a role in IH development due to their degradation of the extracellular matrix. Doxycycline (Doxy), a member of the tetracycline family of antibiotics, is a potent MMP inhibitor. We have previously shown that Doxy inhibits MMP activity and vascular smooth muscle cell migration in vitro. We hypothesized that Doxy would decrease MMP activity in vivo and inhibit the development of IH in a rodent model of vascular injury. Methods and Results: Doxy (400 mg/pellet) was delivered by a slow-release pellet implanted 3 days prior to or at the time of balloon angioplasty (BA) of the common carotid artery in female rats. At 14 days post-BA, intima-to-media (I:M) ratios were 0.77 ± 0.21 and 1.04 ± 0.32 in the Doxy treated groups, respectively, compared to 1.25 ± 0.26 in the control group (P = not significant; n = 3). Additionally, the tested dose of Doxy in either group had no inhibitory effect on membrane type 1-MMP or MMP-2 tissue levels, as measured by immunohistochemistry, or on systemic levels of MMP, as measured by total MMP serum levels using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. At 14 days post-BA, VSMC proliferation in the injured artery was increased to Doxy treatment prior to and at the time of surgery (23.5 ± 3.4 and 27.2 ± 3.9%, respectively), compared to control (11.4 ± 0.4%; n = 3), as measured by proliferating cellular nuclear antigen immunostaining. Conclusions: In our in vivo model of vascular injury, systemic Doxy administration prior to or at the time of vascular injury does not significantly hinder the progression of IH development. Additional doses and routes of administration could be examined in order to correlate therapeutic serum levels of Doxy with effective MMP inhibition in serum and arterial tissue. However, alternative drug delivery systems are needed in order to optimize therapeutic administration of targeted MMP inhibitors for the prevention of IH development.

AB - Background: Intimal hyperplasia (IH) is the most common indicator for secondary intervention in peripheral vascular disease. Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) play a role in IH development due to their degradation of the extracellular matrix. Doxycycline (Doxy), a member of the tetracycline family of antibiotics, is a potent MMP inhibitor. We have previously shown that Doxy inhibits MMP activity and vascular smooth muscle cell migration in vitro. We hypothesized that Doxy would decrease MMP activity in vivo and inhibit the development of IH in a rodent model of vascular injury. Methods and Results: Doxy (400 mg/pellet) was delivered by a slow-release pellet implanted 3 days prior to or at the time of balloon angioplasty (BA) of the common carotid artery in female rats. At 14 days post-BA, intima-to-media (I:M) ratios were 0.77 ± 0.21 and 1.04 ± 0.32 in the Doxy treated groups, respectively, compared to 1.25 ± 0.26 in the control group (P = not significant; n = 3). Additionally, the tested dose of Doxy in either group had no inhibitory effect on membrane type 1-MMP or MMP-2 tissue levels, as measured by immunohistochemistry, or on systemic levels of MMP, as measured by total MMP serum levels using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. At 14 days post-BA, VSMC proliferation in the injured artery was increased to Doxy treatment prior to and at the time of surgery (23.5 ± 3.4 and 27.2 ± 3.9%, respectively), compared to control (11.4 ± 0.4%; n = 3), as measured by proliferating cellular nuclear antigen immunostaining. Conclusions: In our in vivo model of vascular injury, systemic Doxy administration prior to or at the time of vascular injury does not significantly hinder the progression of IH development. Additional doses and routes of administration could be examined in order to correlate therapeutic serum levels of Doxy with effective MMP inhibition in serum and arterial tissue. However, alternative drug delivery systems are needed in order to optimize therapeutic administration of targeted MMP inhibitors for the prevention of IH development.

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DO - 10.1016/j.avsg.2018.11.005

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