The evaluation of pain in patients with knee osteoarthritis

The knee pain scale

W. J. Rejeski, W. H. Ettinger, S. Shumaker, M. D. Heuser, P. James, J. Monu, Robert Burns

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

83 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective. To develop and validate a knee pain scale (KPS) for use with patients with osteoarthritis (OA) of the knee. Methods. Patients with documented evidence of knee OA completed the KPS and a test battery including measures of physical functioning, physical performance, and depression. Analyses were conducted to confirm the 4-factor structure of the measure, determine alpha reliabilities, assess the test-retest reliability, and examine the construct validity of the KPS. Results. Confirmatory factor analysis revealed that the KPS has 4 subscales, including frequency and intensity of pain experienced during both ambulation/climbing and transfer activities. All reliabilities were in excess of 0.80 and the subscales of the KPS shared expected variance with both self-reported and objective indices of dysfunction. Conclusion. The KPS has good psychometric properties for assessing pain experienced in conjunction with the performance of activities of daily living. Although at present it is a research tool, with further study it should prove valuable in clinical practice as well.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1124-1129
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Rheumatology
Volume22
Issue number6
StatePublished - Jan 1 1995
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Knee Osteoarthritis
Pain
Knee
Activities of Daily Living
Psychometrics
Reproducibility of Results
Statistical Factor Analysis
Walking
Depression
Research

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Rheumatology
  • Immunology and Allergy
  • Immunology

Cite this

Rejeski, W. J., Ettinger, W. H., Shumaker, S., Heuser, M. D., James, P., Monu, J., & Burns, R. (1995). The evaluation of pain in patients with knee osteoarthritis: The knee pain scale. Journal of Rheumatology, 22(6), 1124-1129.

The evaluation of pain in patients with knee osteoarthritis : The knee pain scale. / Rejeski, W. J.; Ettinger, W. H.; Shumaker, S.; Heuser, M. D.; James, P.; Monu, J.; Burns, Robert.

In: Journal of Rheumatology, Vol. 22, No. 6, 01.01.1995, p. 1124-1129.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Rejeski, WJ, Ettinger, WH, Shumaker, S, Heuser, MD, James, P, Monu, J & Burns, R 1995, 'The evaluation of pain in patients with knee osteoarthritis: The knee pain scale', Journal of Rheumatology, vol. 22, no. 6, pp. 1124-1129.
Rejeski WJ, Ettinger WH, Shumaker S, Heuser MD, James P, Monu J et al. The evaluation of pain in patients with knee osteoarthritis: The knee pain scale. Journal of Rheumatology. 1995 Jan 1;22(6):1124-1129.
Rejeski, W. J. ; Ettinger, W. H. ; Shumaker, S. ; Heuser, M. D. ; James, P. ; Monu, J. ; Burns, Robert. / The evaluation of pain in patients with knee osteoarthritis : The knee pain scale. In: Journal of Rheumatology. 1995 ; Vol. 22, No. 6. pp. 1124-1129.
@article{bec9219a26ff43fd90ec12c5fd2c139c,
title = "The evaluation of pain in patients with knee osteoarthritis: The knee pain scale",
abstract = "Objective. To develop and validate a knee pain scale (KPS) for use with patients with osteoarthritis (OA) of the knee. Methods. Patients with documented evidence of knee OA completed the KPS and a test battery including measures of physical functioning, physical performance, and depression. Analyses were conducted to confirm the 4-factor structure of the measure, determine alpha reliabilities, assess the test-retest reliability, and examine the construct validity of the KPS. Results. Confirmatory factor analysis revealed that the KPS has 4 subscales, including frequency and intensity of pain experienced during both ambulation/climbing and transfer activities. All reliabilities were in excess of 0.80 and the subscales of the KPS shared expected variance with both self-reported and objective indices of dysfunction. Conclusion. The KPS has good psychometric properties for assessing pain experienced in conjunction with the performance of activities of daily living. Although at present it is a research tool, with further study it should prove valuable in clinical practice as well.",
author = "Rejeski, {W. J.} and Ettinger, {W. H.} and S. Shumaker and Heuser, {M. D.} and P. James and J. Monu and Robert Burns",
year = "1995",
month = "1",
day = "1",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "22",
pages = "1124--1129",
journal = "Journal of Rheumatology",
issn = "0315-162X",
publisher = "Journal of Rheumatology",
number = "6",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - The evaluation of pain in patients with knee osteoarthritis

T2 - The knee pain scale

AU - Rejeski, W. J.

AU - Ettinger, W. H.

AU - Shumaker, S.

AU - Heuser, M. D.

AU - James, P.

AU - Monu, J.

AU - Burns, Robert

PY - 1995/1/1

Y1 - 1995/1/1

N2 - Objective. To develop and validate a knee pain scale (KPS) for use with patients with osteoarthritis (OA) of the knee. Methods. Patients with documented evidence of knee OA completed the KPS and a test battery including measures of physical functioning, physical performance, and depression. Analyses were conducted to confirm the 4-factor structure of the measure, determine alpha reliabilities, assess the test-retest reliability, and examine the construct validity of the KPS. Results. Confirmatory factor analysis revealed that the KPS has 4 subscales, including frequency and intensity of pain experienced during both ambulation/climbing and transfer activities. All reliabilities were in excess of 0.80 and the subscales of the KPS shared expected variance with both self-reported and objective indices of dysfunction. Conclusion. The KPS has good psychometric properties for assessing pain experienced in conjunction with the performance of activities of daily living. Although at present it is a research tool, with further study it should prove valuable in clinical practice as well.

AB - Objective. To develop and validate a knee pain scale (KPS) for use with patients with osteoarthritis (OA) of the knee. Methods. Patients with documented evidence of knee OA completed the KPS and a test battery including measures of physical functioning, physical performance, and depression. Analyses were conducted to confirm the 4-factor structure of the measure, determine alpha reliabilities, assess the test-retest reliability, and examine the construct validity of the KPS. Results. Confirmatory factor analysis revealed that the KPS has 4 subscales, including frequency and intensity of pain experienced during both ambulation/climbing and transfer activities. All reliabilities were in excess of 0.80 and the subscales of the KPS shared expected variance with both self-reported and objective indices of dysfunction. Conclusion. The KPS has good psychometric properties for assessing pain experienced in conjunction with the performance of activities of daily living. Although at present it is a research tool, with further study it should prove valuable in clinical practice as well.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0029059848&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0029059848&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Article

VL - 22

SP - 1124

EP - 1129

JO - Journal of Rheumatology

JF - Journal of Rheumatology

SN - 0315-162X

IS - 6

ER -