The evolution of the basal ganglia in mammals and other vertebrates

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Traditional views of mammalian basal ganglia evolution, as reflected in the terms paleostriatum and neostriatum as synonyms for globus pallidus and caudate-putamen, respectively, assume that the globus pallidus arose before the caudate-putamen during vertebrate phylogeny. Moreover, the cerebral cortex was thought to supplant the role of the basal ganglia in motor control in these traditional theories of basal ganglia evolution, resulting in the replacement of a reptilian stereotyped behavioral repertoire with the adaptable mammalian behavioral capacity. In this article, I review evidence showing that both the striatum and the pallidum have been basal ganglia constituents since early in vertebrate evolution, underscoring what is now known about their functional inseparability. I also review data emphasizing the functional interrelatedness of the cerebral cortex and basal ganglia, with both enlarging in parallel during brain expansion in the mammalian radiation.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationMammals
PublisherElsevier Inc.
Pages397-411
Number of pages15
Volume3
ISBN (Print)9780123708786
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2007

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Basal Ganglia
Globus Pallidus
Vertebrates
Mammals
vertebrates
mammals
cerebral cortex
Putamen
Cerebral Cortex
Neostriatum
Phylogeny
Radiation
brain
phylogeny
Brain

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Agricultural and Biological Sciences(all)

Cite this

The evolution of the basal ganglia in mammals and other vertebrates. / Reiner, Anton.

Mammals. Vol. 3 Elsevier Inc., 2007. p. 397-411.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Reiner, Anton. / The evolution of the basal ganglia in mammals and other vertebrates. Mammals. Vol. 3 Elsevier Inc., 2007. pp. 397-411
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