The first North American use of the Pipeline Flex flow diverter

Edward A M Duckworth, Christopher Nickele, Daniel Hoit, Andrey Belayev, Christopher J. Moran, Adam S. Arthur

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Flow diversion for the management of intracranial aneurysms represents a paradigm shift in how aneurysms are managed. The Pipeline embolization device (PED) is, to date, the only flow diverter approved for use in the USA by the Food and Drug Administration. Limitations and complications with new treatment strategies are inevitable, and with the PED there have been reports of complications, most commonly with challenging deployments. Once deployment has been initiated, the device is 'one-way'; it can only be deployed further or removed. Yet, situations arise in which the ability to recapture or reposition the device would be advantageous. A second-generation Pipeline has been developed that addresses these concerns. We report the first use in North America of this second-generation Pipeline device: the Pipeline Flex. We discuss our rationale for using the device, our impressions of its operation, and the relevant literature concerning the current state of flow diversion.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)e8
JournalJournal of NeuroInterventional Surgery
Volume8
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 1 2016

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Equipment and Supplies
Intracranial Aneurysm
United States Food and Drug Administration
North America
Aneurysm

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Surgery
  • Clinical Neurology

Cite this

The first North American use of the Pipeline Flex flow diverter. / Duckworth, Edward A M; Nickele, Christopher; Hoit, Daniel; Belayev, Andrey; Moran, Christopher J.; Arthur, Adam S.

In: Journal of NeuroInterventional Surgery, Vol. 8, No. 2, 01.02.2016, p. e8.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Duckworth, Edward A M ; Nickele, Christopher ; Hoit, Daniel ; Belayev, Andrey ; Moran, Christopher J. ; Arthur, Adam S. / The first North American use of the Pipeline Flex flow diverter. In: Journal of NeuroInterventional Surgery. 2016 ; Vol. 8, No. 2. pp. e8.
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