The functional anatomy of the basal ganglia of birds

L. Medina, Y. Jiao, Anton Reiner

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

12 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

To study how the basal ganglia can control movement in birds, we have reinvestigated the connections of the pigeon dorsal pallidum. Our results indicate that avian basal ganglia appear to control movement through major projections to several premotor pretectal and tegmental centres which innervate the tectum, and through a minor projection to a possible motor thalamic centre which innervates the Wulst. For such control, separate striatopallidal output circuits appear to exist in birds that are remarkably similar to those described in mammals, suggesting that avian and mammalian basal ganglia may control movement through similar mechanisms, and that the morphological substrate for such control evolved earlier than previously thought.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)160-165
Number of pages6
JournalEuropean Journal of Morphology
Volume37
Issue number2-3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 5 1999

Fingerprint

Basal Ganglia
Birds
Anatomy
birds
Globus Pallidus
Columbidae
pigeons
Mammals
mammals

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Anatomy
  • Agricultural and Biological Sciences (miscellaneous)

Cite this

The functional anatomy of the basal ganglia of birds. / Medina, L.; Jiao, Y.; Reiner, Anton.

In: European Journal of Morphology, Vol. 37, No. 2-3, 05.06.1999, p. 160-165.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Medina, L. ; Jiao, Y. ; Reiner, Anton. / The functional anatomy of the basal ganglia of birds. In: European Journal of Morphology. 1999 ; Vol. 37, No. 2-3. pp. 160-165.
@article{89f9a313af344b47aabd69f2a1b9b747,
title = "The functional anatomy of the basal ganglia of birds",
abstract = "To study how the basal ganglia can control movement in birds, we have reinvestigated the connections of the pigeon dorsal pallidum. Our results indicate that avian basal ganglia appear to control movement through major projections to several premotor pretectal and tegmental centres which innervate the tectum, and through a minor projection to a possible motor thalamic centre which innervates the Wulst. For such control, separate striatopallidal output circuits appear to exist in birds that are remarkably similar to those described in mammals, suggesting that avian and mammalian basal ganglia may control movement through similar mechanisms, and that the morphological substrate for such control evolved earlier than previously thought.",
author = "L. Medina and Y. Jiao and Anton Reiner",
year = "1999",
month = "6",
day = "5",
doi = "10.1076/ejom.37.2.160.4735",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "37",
pages = "160--165",
journal = "European Journal of Morphology",
issn = "0924-3860",
publisher = "Swets & Zeitlinger",
number = "2-3",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - The functional anatomy of the basal ganglia of birds

AU - Medina, L.

AU - Jiao, Y.

AU - Reiner, Anton

PY - 1999/6/5

Y1 - 1999/6/5

N2 - To study how the basal ganglia can control movement in birds, we have reinvestigated the connections of the pigeon dorsal pallidum. Our results indicate that avian basal ganglia appear to control movement through major projections to several premotor pretectal and tegmental centres which innervate the tectum, and through a minor projection to a possible motor thalamic centre which innervates the Wulst. For such control, separate striatopallidal output circuits appear to exist in birds that are remarkably similar to those described in mammals, suggesting that avian and mammalian basal ganglia may control movement through similar mechanisms, and that the morphological substrate for such control evolved earlier than previously thought.

AB - To study how the basal ganglia can control movement in birds, we have reinvestigated the connections of the pigeon dorsal pallidum. Our results indicate that avian basal ganglia appear to control movement through major projections to several premotor pretectal and tegmental centres which innervate the tectum, and through a minor projection to a possible motor thalamic centre which innervates the Wulst. For such control, separate striatopallidal output circuits appear to exist in birds that are remarkably similar to those described in mammals, suggesting that avian and mammalian basal ganglia may control movement through similar mechanisms, and that the morphological substrate for such control evolved earlier than previously thought.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0032980207&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0032980207&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1076/ejom.37.2.160.4735

DO - 10.1076/ejom.37.2.160.4735

M3 - Article

VL - 37

SP - 160

EP - 165

JO - European Journal of Morphology

JF - European Journal of Morphology

SN - 0924-3860

IS - 2-3

ER -