The geometric effect of an off-centered cross-section on nickel–titanium rotary instruments

A finite element analysis study

Jung Hong Ha, Sang Won Kwak, Antheunis Versluis, Chan Joo Lee, Se Hee Park, Hyeon Cheol Kim

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background/purpose Geometric design dictates the mechanical performance of nickel–titanium rotary instruments. Using finite element (FE) analysis, this study evaluated the effects of an off-centered cross-sectional design on the stiffness and stress distribution of nickel–titanium rotary instruments. Materials and methods We constructed three-dimensional FE models, using ProTaper-NEXT type design (PTN) as well as three other virtual instruments with varied cross-sectional aspect ratios but all with the same cross-sectional area. The cross-sectional aspect ratio of the PTN was 0.75, while others were assigned to have ratios of 1.0 (square), 1.5 (rectangle), and 2.215 (centered-rectangle). The PTN center of the cross-section was ‘k’, while others were designed to have 0.9992k, 0.7k, and 0 for the square, rectangle, and centered-rectangle models, respectively. To compare the stiffness of the four FE models, we numerically analyzed their mechanical response under bending and torque. Results Under the bending condition, the square model was found to be the stiffest, followed by the PTN, rectangle, and then the centered-rectangle model. Under the torsion, the square model had the smallest distortion angle, while the rectangular model had the highest distortion angle. Conclusion Under the limitation of this study, the PTN type off-centered cross-sectional design appeared the most optimal configuration among the tested designs for high bending stiffness with cutting efficiency while rotational stiffness remained similar with the other designs.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)173-178
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Dental Sciences
Volume12
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 1 2017

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Finite Element Analysis
Torque

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Dentistry(all)

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The geometric effect of an off-centered cross-section on nickel–titanium rotary instruments : A finite element analysis study. / Ha, Jung Hong; Kwak, Sang Won; Versluis, Antheunis; Lee, Chan Joo; Park, Se Hee; Kim, Hyeon Cheol.

In: Journal of Dental Sciences, Vol. 12, No. 2, 01.06.2017, p. 173-178.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Ha, Jung Hong ; Kwak, Sang Won ; Versluis, Antheunis ; Lee, Chan Joo ; Park, Se Hee ; Kim, Hyeon Cheol. / The geometric effect of an off-centered cross-section on nickel–titanium rotary instruments : A finite element analysis study. In: Journal of Dental Sciences. 2017 ; Vol. 12, No. 2. pp. 173-178.
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abstract = "Background/purpose Geometric design dictates the mechanical performance of nickel–titanium rotary instruments. Using finite element (FE) analysis, this study evaluated the effects of an off-centered cross-sectional design on the stiffness and stress distribution of nickel–titanium rotary instruments. Materials and methods We constructed three-dimensional FE models, using ProTaper-NEXT type design (PTN) as well as three other virtual instruments with varied cross-sectional aspect ratios but all with the same cross-sectional area. The cross-sectional aspect ratio of the PTN was 0.75, while others were assigned to have ratios of 1.0 (square), 1.5 (rectangle), and 2.215 (centered-rectangle). The PTN center of the cross-section was ‘k’, while others were designed to have 0.9992k, 0.7k, and 0 for the square, rectangle, and centered-rectangle models, respectively. To compare the stiffness of the four FE models, we numerically analyzed their mechanical response under bending and torque. Results Under the bending condition, the square model was found to be the stiffest, followed by the PTN, rectangle, and then the centered-rectangle model. Under the torsion, the square model had the smallest distortion angle, while the rectangular model had the highest distortion angle. Conclusion Under the limitation of this study, the PTN type off-centered cross-sectional design appeared the most optimal configuration among the tested designs for high bending stiffness with cutting efficiency while rotational stiffness remained similar with the other designs.",
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