The impact of aborted radical hysterectomy in patients with cervical carcinoma

Charles A. Leath, J. Michael Straughn, Jacob M. Estes, Tyler O. Kirby, Snehal M. Bhoola, Mack N. Barnes, Larry Kilgore, Ronald D. Alvarez

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

10 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

To determine the impact of an aborted radical hysterectomy on morbidity and overall survival in patients undergoing surgical treatment for early stage cervical carcinoma. Following IRB approval, a computerized database identified 304 women treated with radical surgery for early stage cervical carcinoma from 1994 to 2000 of which 23 (8%) had an aborted radical hysterectomy. Of the 23 patients, 17 patients had a IB 1 lesion, 4 patients had a IB 2 lesion, and 2 patients had a IIA lesion. Median age was 42 years (range 28-60). Twenty-one patients had squamous cell carcinoma and two patients had adenocarcinoma. Radical hysterectomy was aborted for the following reasons: 11 patients had pelvic extension, seven had positive pelvic nodes, and five patients had positive paraaortic nodes. All 23 patients received postoperative radiation therapy; additionally, 12 patients received concurrent chemotherapy consisting of platinum with or without 5-FU. There were four operative complications (17%) including deep vein thrombosis, wound infection, blood transfusion, and an ileus. Four patients (17%) had radiation-associated complications. Six of 23 (26%) patients experienced a recurrence. The 5-year overall survival was 83% with a median follow-up of 59 months (range 12-107 months). A small percentage of patients (8%) with early stage cervical carcinoma will have an aborted radical hysterectomy for pelvic extension or positive nodes. Fortunately, these patients still have a favorable prognosis with postoperative radiation therapy. Aborted radical surgery does not significantly increase overall complications.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)204-207
Number of pages4
JournalGynecologic oncology
Volume95
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1 2004

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Hysterectomy
Carcinoma
Radiotherapy
Survival
Ileus
Research Ethics Committees
Wound Infection
Platinum
Venous Thrombosis
Fluorouracil
Blood Transfusion
Squamous Cell Carcinoma
Adenocarcinoma

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Oncology
  • Obstetrics and Gynecology

Cite this

Leath, C. A., Straughn, J. M., Estes, J. M., Kirby, T. O., Bhoola, S. M., Barnes, M. N., ... Alvarez, R. D. (2004). The impact of aborted radical hysterectomy in patients with cervical carcinoma. Gynecologic oncology, 95(1), 204-207. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ygyno.2004.07.034

The impact of aborted radical hysterectomy in patients with cervical carcinoma. / Leath, Charles A.; Straughn, J. Michael; Estes, Jacob M.; Kirby, Tyler O.; Bhoola, Snehal M.; Barnes, Mack N.; Kilgore, Larry; Alvarez, Ronald D.

In: Gynecologic oncology, Vol. 95, No. 1, 01.10.2004, p. 204-207.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Leath, CA, Straughn, JM, Estes, JM, Kirby, TO, Bhoola, SM, Barnes, MN, Kilgore, L & Alvarez, RD 2004, 'The impact of aborted radical hysterectomy in patients with cervical carcinoma', Gynecologic oncology, vol. 95, no. 1, pp. 204-207. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ygyno.2004.07.034
Leath CA, Straughn JM, Estes JM, Kirby TO, Bhoola SM, Barnes MN et al. The impact of aborted radical hysterectomy in patients with cervical carcinoma. Gynecologic oncology. 2004 Oct 1;95(1):204-207. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ygyno.2004.07.034
Leath, Charles A. ; Straughn, J. Michael ; Estes, Jacob M. ; Kirby, Tyler O. ; Bhoola, Snehal M. ; Barnes, Mack N. ; Kilgore, Larry ; Alvarez, Ronald D. / The impact of aborted radical hysterectomy in patients with cervical carcinoma. In: Gynecologic oncology. 2004 ; Vol. 95, No. 1. pp. 204-207.
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