The impact of minimally invasive spine surgery on perioperative complications in overweight or obese patients

Paul Park, Cheerag Upadhyaya, Hugh J.L. Garton, Kevin Foley

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

60 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

OBJECTIVE: Open lumbar spinal surgery in overweight or obese patients has been associated with increased risk of perioperative complications. The impact of minimally invasive spinal (MIS) surgery on the incidence of perioperative adverse events in overweight or obese patients, however, has not been well evaluated. METHODS: A retrospective review of consecutive patients undergoing lumbar MIS surgery from January 2006 to April 2007 was performed. Of the 77 patients identified, 56 had a body mass index (BMI) of 25.0 kg/m or greater. RESULTS: Of the 56 patients with a BMI of 25 kg/m or greater, 32 (57.1%) were men; the mean age was 54.1 years. The mean BMI was 31.0 kg/m (range, 25.1-43.8 kg/m). Using a broad definition of an adverse event, eight (14.3%) complications were identified. In the discectomy/laminotomy subgroup (31 patients), two (6.5%) adverse events were noted. In the fusion subgroup (25 patients), six (24%) adverse events were noted, most of which were minor. Of the 21 patients with a BMI less than 25 kg/m, eight (38.1%) were men, and the mean age was 43.7 years. The mean BMI was 22.5 kg/m (range, 16.8-24.6 kg/m). Three (14.3%) complications were noted overall. In the discectomy/laminotomy subgroup (17 patients), two (11.8%) adverse events occurred. One (25%) complication developed in the four patients making up the fusion subgroup. There was no statistically significant difference in complication rates between groups. Logistic regression also found no statistically significant relationship between BMI and perioperative complications. CONCLUSION: There does not appear to be an increased risk of developing perioperative complications in overweight or obese patients undergoing MIS surgery, which may reflect a potential benefit of the MIS approach.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)693-698
Number of pages6
JournalNeurosurgery
Volume62
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1 2008

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Minimally Invasive Surgical Procedures
Spine
Body Mass Index
Diskectomy
Laminectomy
Logistic Models

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Surgery
  • Clinical Neurology

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The impact of minimally invasive spine surgery on perioperative complications in overweight or obese patients. / Park, Paul; Upadhyaya, Cheerag; Garton, Hugh J.L.; Foley, Kevin.

In: Neurosurgery, Vol. 62, No. 3, 01.03.2008, p. 693-698.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Park, Paul ; Upadhyaya, Cheerag ; Garton, Hugh J.L. ; Foley, Kevin. / The impact of minimally invasive spine surgery on perioperative complications in overweight or obese patients. In: Neurosurgery. 2008 ; Vol. 62, No. 3. pp. 693-698.
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abstract = "OBJECTIVE: Open lumbar spinal surgery in overweight or obese patients has been associated with increased risk of perioperative complications. The impact of minimally invasive spinal (MIS) surgery on the incidence of perioperative adverse events in overweight or obese patients, however, has not been well evaluated. METHODS: A retrospective review of consecutive patients undergoing lumbar MIS surgery from January 2006 to April 2007 was performed. Of the 77 patients identified, 56 had a body mass index (BMI) of 25.0 kg/m or greater. RESULTS: Of the 56 patients with a BMI of 25 kg/m or greater, 32 (57.1{\%}) were men; the mean age was 54.1 years. The mean BMI was 31.0 kg/m (range, 25.1-43.8 kg/m). Using a broad definition of an adverse event, eight (14.3{\%}) complications were identified. In the discectomy/laminotomy subgroup (31 patients), two (6.5{\%}) adverse events were noted. In the fusion subgroup (25 patients), six (24{\%}) adverse events were noted, most of which were minor. Of the 21 patients with a BMI less than 25 kg/m, eight (38.1{\%}) were men, and the mean age was 43.7 years. The mean BMI was 22.5 kg/m (range, 16.8-24.6 kg/m). Three (14.3{\%}) complications were noted overall. In the discectomy/laminotomy subgroup (17 patients), two (11.8{\%}) adverse events occurred. One (25{\%}) complication developed in the four patients making up the fusion subgroup. There was no statistically significant difference in complication rates between groups. Logistic regression also found no statistically significant relationship between BMI and perioperative complications. CONCLUSION: There does not appear to be an increased risk of developing perioperative complications in overweight or obese patients undergoing MIS surgery, which may reflect a potential benefit of the MIS approach.",
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AB - OBJECTIVE: Open lumbar spinal surgery in overweight or obese patients has been associated with increased risk of perioperative complications. The impact of minimally invasive spinal (MIS) surgery on the incidence of perioperative adverse events in overweight or obese patients, however, has not been well evaluated. METHODS: A retrospective review of consecutive patients undergoing lumbar MIS surgery from January 2006 to April 2007 was performed. Of the 77 patients identified, 56 had a body mass index (BMI) of 25.0 kg/m or greater. RESULTS: Of the 56 patients with a BMI of 25 kg/m or greater, 32 (57.1%) were men; the mean age was 54.1 years. The mean BMI was 31.0 kg/m (range, 25.1-43.8 kg/m). Using a broad definition of an adverse event, eight (14.3%) complications were identified. In the discectomy/laminotomy subgroup (31 patients), two (6.5%) adverse events were noted. In the fusion subgroup (25 patients), six (24%) adverse events were noted, most of which were minor. Of the 21 patients with a BMI less than 25 kg/m, eight (38.1%) were men, and the mean age was 43.7 years. The mean BMI was 22.5 kg/m (range, 16.8-24.6 kg/m). Three (14.3%) complications were noted overall. In the discectomy/laminotomy subgroup (17 patients), two (11.8%) adverse events occurred. One (25%) complication developed in the four patients making up the fusion subgroup. There was no statistically significant difference in complication rates between groups. Logistic regression also found no statistically significant relationship between BMI and perioperative complications. CONCLUSION: There does not appear to be an increased risk of developing perioperative complications in overweight or obese patients undergoing MIS surgery, which may reflect a potential benefit of the MIS approach.

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