The impact of single embryo transfer on embryo donation

Jeffrey Keenan, Reginald Finger

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Abstract

Embryo donation (ED) is the transfer of an embryo originally created for a couple's own use, to an unrelated woman recipient as a treatment for that woman's infertility. This practice has gained widespread acceptance by the infertility community and the public for two reasons. First, ED is an excellent option to help resolve the disposition of some of the thousands of embryos that are no longer wanted by the couples who created them. Second, it is generally a less expensive and sometimes a more effective way to achieve pregnancy than autologous or donor egg in vitro fertilization (IVF). We recently documented excellent pregnancy and live birth rates seen in embryo donation in seven programs [1]. Generally, ED programs have transferred more than one embryo at a time. In fact, in our study the average number of embryos transferred was 3.05. However, in recognition of the medical consequences of multiple pregnancy [2–4] and the resulting case for single embryo transfer (SET) that is described elsewhere in this book, it is necessary to recognize SET as a legitimate trend. Therefore we must make two assessments: first, as SET becomes more widely used in IVF generally, what is the impact of that trend on ED? Second, is there any place for the use of SET within ED itself? No studies have yet been performed that directly assess the impact of SET on ED. Therefore, we must analyze the findings that have been published on SET to estimate what that impact might be.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationSingle Embryo Transfer
PublisherCambridge University Press
Pages139-142
Number of pages4
ISBN (Electronic)9780511545160
ISBN (Print)9780521888349
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2008
Externally publishedYes

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Embryo Disposition
Single Embryo Transfer
Embryonic Structures
Fertilization in Vitro
Infertility
Multiple Pregnancy
Embryo Transfer
Pregnancy Rate
Ovum
Tissue Donors
Pregnancy

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Keenan, J., & Finger, R. (2008). The impact of single embryo transfer on embryo donation. In Single Embryo Transfer (pp. 139-142). Cambridge University Press. https://doi.org/10.1017/CBO9780511545160.014

The impact of single embryo transfer on embryo donation. / Keenan, Jeffrey; Finger, Reginald.

Single Embryo Transfer. Cambridge University Press, 2008. p. 139-142.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Keenan, J & Finger, R 2008, The impact of single embryo transfer on embryo donation. in Single Embryo Transfer. Cambridge University Press, pp. 139-142. https://doi.org/10.1017/CBO9780511545160.014
Keenan J, Finger R. The impact of single embryo transfer on embryo donation. In Single Embryo Transfer. Cambridge University Press. 2008. p. 139-142 https://doi.org/10.1017/CBO9780511545160.014
Keenan, Jeffrey ; Finger, Reginald. / The impact of single embryo transfer on embryo donation. Single Embryo Transfer. Cambridge University Press, 2008. pp. 139-142
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