The impact of unplanned conversion to an open procedure during minimally invasive pancreatectomy

Zachary E. Stiles, Paxton V. Dickson, Jeremiah Deneve, Evan Glazer, Lei Dong, Jim Wan, Stephen W. Behrman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Minimally invasive pancreatic resection (MIPR) is being increasingly utilized. Outcomes for patients experiencing unplanned conversion to an open procedure during MIPR have been incompletely assessed. We sought to determine the short-term outcomes and factors associated with unplanned conversion during MIPR. Methods: A retrospective cohort study using the American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program pancreatectomy-targeted data set was conducted. Successful MIPR was compared with unplanned conversion. Propensity matching was used to separately compare unplanned conversion during MIPR with planned open pancreatectomy. Results: Unplanned conversion occurred in 24.6% of 350 attempted minimally invasive pancreatoduodenectomy (MIPD) and 19.6% of 1174 attempted minimally invasive distal pancreatectomy (MIDP). Conversion was associated with greater overall morbidity and 30-day mortality compared with successful MIPR for both MIPD and MIDP. After matching, unplanned conversion resulted in outcomes equivalent or inferior to open pancreatectomy. Factors significantly associated with unplanned conversion during MIPD included intermediate gland texture, vascular resection, hypertension, disseminated cancer, and chronic steroid use. For MIDP, male sex, hard gland texture, vascular resection, smoking, and recent weight loss were independently associated with conversion. A robotic approach was inversely associated with conversion for MIPD and MIDP. Conclusions: Unplanned conversion during MIPR is associated with greater morbidity and 30-day mortality. Conversion resulted in outcomes that, at best, mimicked those of open pancreatectomy. Several risk factors including the need for vascular resection are associated with unplanned conversion and should be acknowledged when planning an operative approach.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)168-177
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of Surgical Research
Volume227
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 1 2018

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Conversion to Open Surgery
Pancreatectomy
Pancreaticoduodenectomy
Blood Vessels
Morbidity
Mortality
Robotics
Quality Improvement
Weight Loss
Cohort Studies
Retrospective Studies
Smoking
Steroids
Hypertension

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Surgery

Cite this

The impact of unplanned conversion to an open procedure during minimally invasive pancreatectomy. / Stiles, Zachary E.; Dickson, Paxton V.; Deneve, Jeremiah; Glazer, Evan; Dong, Lei; Wan, Jim; Behrman, Stephen W.

In: Journal of Surgical Research, Vol. 227, 01.07.2018, p. 168-177.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Stiles, Zachary E. ; Dickson, Paxton V. ; Deneve, Jeremiah ; Glazer, Evan ; Dong, Lei ; Wan, Jim ; Behrman, Stephen W. / The impact of unplanned conversion to an open procedure during minimally invasive pancreatectomy. In: Journal of Surgical Research. 2018 ; Vol. 227. pp. 168-177.
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N2 - Background: Minimally invasive pancreatic resection (MIPR) is being increasingly utilized. Outcomes for patients experiencing unplanned conversion to an open procedure during MIPR have been incompletely assessed. We sought to determine the short-term outcomes and factors associated with unplanned conversion during MIPR. Methods: A retrospective cohort study using the American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program pancreatectomy-targeted data set was conducted. Successful MIPR was compared with unplanned conversion. Propensity matching was used to separately compare unplanned conversion during MIPR with planned open pancreatectomy. Results: Unplanned conversion occurred in 24.6% of 350 attempted minimally invasive pancreatoduodenectomy (MIPD) and 19.6% of 1174 attempted minimally invasive distal pancreatectomy (MIDP). Conversion was associated with greater overall morbidity and 30-day mortality compared with successful MIPR for both MIPD and MIDP. After matching, unplanned conversion resulted in outcomes equivalent or inferior to open pancreatectomy. Factors significantly associated with unplanned conversion during MIPD included intermediate gland texture, vascular resection, hypertension, disseminated cancer, and chronic steroid use. For MIDP, male sex, hard gland texture, vascular resection, smoking, and recent weight loss were independently associated with conversion. A robotic approach was inversely associated with conversion for MIPD and MIDP. Conclusions: Unplanned conversion during MIPR is associated with greater morbidity and 30-day mortality. Conversion resulted in outcomes that, at best, mimicked those of open pancreatectomy. Several risk factors including the need for vascular resection are associated with unplanned conversion and should be acknowledged when planning an operative approach.

AB - Background: Minimally invasive pancreatic resection (MIPR) is being increasingly utilized. Outcomes for patients experiencing unplanned conversion to an open procedure during MIPR have been incompletely assessed. We sought to determine the short-term outcomes and factors associated with unplanned conversion during MIPR. Methods: A retrospective cohort study using the American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program pancreatectomy-targeted data set was conducted. Successful MIPR was compared with unplanned conversion. Propensity matching was used to separately compare unplanned conversion during MIPR with planned open pancreatectomy. Results: Unplanned conversion occurred in 24.6% of 350 attempted minimally invasive pancreatoduodenectomy (MIPD) and 19.6% of 1174 attempted minimally invasive distal pancreatectomy (MIDP). Conversion was associated with greater overall morbidity and 30-day mortality compared with successful MIPR for both MIPD and MIDP. After matching, unplanned conversion resulted in outcomes equivalent or inferior to open pancreatectomy. Factors significantly associated with unplanned conversion during MIPD included intermediate gland texture, vascular resection, hypertension, disseminated cancer, and chronic steroid use. For MIDP, male sex, hard gland texture, vascular resection, smoking, and recent weight loss were independently associated with conversion. A robotic approach was inversely associated with conversion for MIPD and MIDP. Conclusions: Unplanned conversion during MIPR is associated with greater morbidity and 30-day mortality. Conversion resulted in outcomes that, at best, mimicked those of open pancreatectomy. Several risk factors including the need for vascular resection are associated with unplanned conversion and should be acknowledged when planning an operative approach.

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