The incidence and pattern of maxillofacial injuries in helmeted versus non-helmeted motorcycle accident patients

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Abstract

Purpose The aim of this study was to investigate the difference in incidence and pattern of bony and soft tissue injuries sustained by helmeted versus non-helmeted motorcycle accident patients. Materials and Methods The medical records of motorcycle accident patients over a 10-year period were reviewed. Basic demographic data including age, gender, and Injury Severity Score (ISS) were collected. The patients were separated into 2 groups based on helmet use. For each group, the incidence of specific maxillofacial injuries (based on the International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision) was tallied. Statistical analysis was performed with the Fisher exact test. Results A total of 717 patients were included in the study: 598 patients (mean age, 41.6 years; male gender, 90.8%; ISS, 18.2) were in the helmeted group and 119 patients (mean age, 40.8 years; male gender, 90.8%; ISS, 19.5) were in the non-helmeted group. Among the helmeted riders, 26.1% (n = 156) sustained a maxillofacial injury, and among the non-helmeted riders, 45.4% (n = 54) sustained a maxillofacial injury (P =.0001). The non-helmeted riders also had a significantly higher incidence of malar and maxillary fractures (P =.040), orbital fractures (P =.044), and soft tissue contusions and abrasions (P =.031). Conclusions The results of this study suggest that not only do helmets protect against facial injuries in totality, they appear to be more effective at preventing midfacial fractures when compared with mandible fractures.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)2503-2506
Number of pages4
JournalJournal of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery
Volume72
Issue number12
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2014

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Maxillofacial Injuries
Motorcycles
Accidents
Injury Severity Score
Incidence
Head Protective Devices
Maxillary Fractures
Facial Injuries
Orbital Fractures
Soft Tissue Injuries
Contusions
International Classification of Diseases
Mandible
Medical Records
Demography

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Surgery
  • Oral Surgery
  • Otorhinolaryngology

Cite this

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title = "The incidence and pattern of maxillofacial injuries in helmeted versus non-helmeted motorcycle accident patients",
abstract = "Purpose The aim of this study was to investigate the difference in incidence and pattern of bony and soft tissue injuries sustained by helmeted versus non-helmeted motorcycle accident patients. Materials and Methods The medical records of motorcycle accident patients over a 10-year period were reviewed. Basic demographic data including age, gender, and Injury Severity Score (ISS) were collected. The patients were separated into 2 groups based on helmet use. For each group, the incidence of specific maxillofacial injuries (based on the International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision) was tallied. Statistical analysis was performed with the Fisher exact test. Results A total of 717 patients were included in the study: 598 patients (mean age, 41.6 years; male gender, 90.8{\%}; ISS, 18.2) were in the helmeted group and 119 patients (mean age, 40.8 years; male gender, 90.8{\%}; ISS, 19.5) were in the non-helmeted group. Among the helmeted riders, 26.1{\%} (n = 156) sustained a maxillofacial injury, and among the non-helmeted riders, 45.4{\%} (n = 54) sustained a maxillofacial injury (P =.0001). The non-helmeted riders also had a significantly higher incidence of malar and maxillary fractures (P =.040), orbital fractures (P =.044), and soft tissue contusions and abrasions (P =.031). Conclusions The results of this study suggest that not only do helmets protect against facial injuries in totality, they appear to be more effective at preventing midfacial fractures when compared with mandible fractures.",
author = "James Christian and Thomas, {Ryan F.} and Mark Scarbecz",
year = "2014",
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language = "English (US)",
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T1 - The incidence and pattern of maxillofacial injuries in helmeted versus non-helmeted motorcycle accident patients

AU - Christian, James

AU - Thomas, Ryan F.

AU - Scarbecz, Mark

PY - 2014/12/1

Y1 - 2014/12/1

N2 - Purpose The aim of this study was to investigate the difference in incidence and pattern of bony and soft tissue injuries sustained by helmeted versus non-helmeted motorcycle accident patients. Materials and Methods The medical records of motorcycle accident patients over a 10-year period were reviewed. Basic demographic data including age, gender, and Injury Severity Score (ISS) were collected. The patients were separated into 2 groups based on helmet use. For each group, the incidence of specific maxillofacial injuries (based on the International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision) was tallied. Statistical analysis was performed with the Fisher exact test. Results A total of 717 patients were included in the study: 598 patients (mean age, 41.6 years; male gender, 90.8%; ISS, 18.2) were in the helmeted group and 119 patients (mean age, 40.8 years; male gender, 90.8%; ISS, 19.5) were in the non-helmeted group. Among the helmeted riders, 26.1% (n = 156) sustained a maxillofacial injury, and among the non-helmeted riders, 45.4% (n = 54) sustained a maxillofacial injury (P =.0001). The non-helmeted riders also had a significantly higher incidence of malar and maxillary fractures (P =.040), orbital fractures (P =.044), and soft tissue contusions and abrasions (P =.031). Conclusions The results of this study suggest that not only do helmets protect against facial injuries in totality, they appear to be more effective at preventing midfacial fractures when compared with mandible fractures.

AB - Purpose The aim of this study was to investigate the difference in incidence and pattern of bony and soft tissue injuries sustained by helmeted versus non-helmeted motorcycle accident patients. Materials and Methods The medical records of motorcycle accident patients over a 10-year period were reviewed. Basic demographic data including age, gender, and Injury Severity Score (ISS) were collected. The patients were separated into 2 groups based on helmet use. For each group, the incidence of specific maxillofacial injuries (based on the International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision) was tallied. Statistical analysis was performed with the Fisher exact test. Results A total of 717 patients were included in the study: 598 patients (mean age, 41.6 years; male gender, 90.8%; ISS, 18.2) were in the helmeted group and 119 patients (mean age, 40.8 years; male gender, 90.8%; ISS, 19.5) were in the non-helmeted group. Among the helmeted riders, 26.1% (n = 156) sustained a maxillofacial injury, and among the non-helmeted riders, 45.4% (n = 54) sustained a maxillofacial injury (P =.0001). The non-helmeted riders also had a significantly higher incidence of malar and maxillary fractures (P =.040), orbital fractures (P =.044), and soft tissue contusions and abrasions (P =.031). Conclusions The results of this study suggest that not only do helmets protect against facial injuries in totality, they appear to be more effective at preventing midfacial fractures when compared with mandible fractures.

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