The influence of age and BMI on intervertebral disc height and oropharyngeal airway in Japanese men and women

Yuko Shigeta, Takumi Ogawa, Jaqueline Venturin, Glenn T. Clark, Reyes Enciso

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: Intervetebral disc height changes with both age and increasing body mass index (BMI), known risk factors for obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). We studied the relationship of body mass index (BMI) and aging in the neck structures to disc compression and oropharyngeal airway size and shape. Materials and methods: The intervertebral disc (IVD), neck and airway volumes were measured at the C2 level only from Computerized Tomography scans using a semi-automatic segmentation tool. The change of intervertebral disc height/volume with age and BMI were examined in 38 consecutive Japanese patients (Male: 19, Female: 19), group matched for age (men: 52.2 ± 15.36 years; women: 52.4 ± 17.37) and BMI (men: 23.1 ± 2.97 m/kg2; women: 21.6 ± 4.03 m/ kg2). Results: In this study, the intervertebral disc volumeas a percent of neck volume was larger in men than in women (P = 0.039), and the intervertebral disc volume (r = -0.588; P = 0.013) and height (r = -0.510; P = 0.037) decreased with increasing age-adjusted BMI in males only. Age was not significantly correlated with any of the volumes. The intervertebral airway volume significantly decreased with increasing age-adjusted BMI in our female subjects (r = -0.588; P = 0.013). Conclusion: In our Japanese volunteer population, the intervertebral disc is compressed vertically with the increase of BMI in males only, and the oropharyngeal airway volume decreases with increasing BMI in females only. These results may be useful in assessment of OSA risk.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)97-103
Number of pages7
JournalInternational journal of computer assisted radiology and surgery
Volume3
Issue number1-2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2008
Externally publishedYes

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Intervertebral Disc
Body Mass Index
Neck
Computerized tomography
Obstructive Sleep Apnea
Compaction
Aging of materials
Volunteers
Research Design
Age Groups
Tomography
Sleep
Population

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Surgery
  • Biomedical Engineering
  • Radiology Nuclear Medicine and imaging
  • Computer Vision and Pattern Recognition
  • Health Informatics
  • Computer Science Applications
  • Computer Graphics and Computer-Aided Design

Cite this

The influence of age and BMI on intervertebral disc height and oropharyngeal airway in Japanese men and women. / Shigeta, Yuko; Ogawa, Takumi; Venturin, Jaqueline; Clark, Glenn T.; Enciso, Reyes.

In: International journal of computer assisted radiology and surgery, Vol. 3, No. 1-2, 01.01.2008, p. 97-103.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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