The influence of opioids on local cerebral glucose utilization in the newborn pig

William M. Armstead, Robert Mirro, Samuel Zuckerman, David W. Busija, Charles Leffler

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

19 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Topical methionine enkephalin, leucine enkephalin, and dynorphin (10-6 M) previously have been observed to produce prominent pial arteriolar dilation. Dilation to these opioids could be caused directly by opioids acting on vascular receptors, or indirectly, as a consequence of increased metabolism. Therefore, we examined this possibility by determining the influence of opioids on cerebral glucose utilization in piglets with closed cranial windows using the [14C]deoxyglucose method. Qualitatively, the autoradiographic images expressed as a change in relative optical density from vehicle were unchanged by these opioids. Quantitatively, the opioids similarly had no effect on cerebral glucose utilization (53 ± 5, 70 ± 8, 63 ± 5, and 52 ± 3, μmol·100 g-1·min-1 for vehicle, methionine enkephalin, leucine enkephalin, and dynorphin, respectively). In contrast, topical glutamate (10-3 M) produced similar dilation but increased cerebral glucose utilization (41 ± 3 vs 89 ± 8 μmol·100 g-1·min-1 for vehicle and glutamate, respectively). Therefore, these opioids do not appear to produce vascular effects through a change in cerebral metabolic utilization of glucose.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)97-102
Number of pages6
JournalBrain Research
Volume571
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 31 1992

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Opioid Analgesics
Swine
Glucose
Leucine Enkephalin
Dynorphins
Dilatation
Methionine Enkephalin
Blood Vessels
Glutamic Acid
Specific Gravity
Deoxyglucose

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Neuroscience(all)
  • Molecular Biology
  • Developmental Biology
  • Clinical Neurology

Cite this

The influence of opioids on local cerebral glucose utilization in the newborn pig. / Armstead, William M.; Mirro, Robert; Zuckerman, Samuel; Busija, David W.; Leffler, Charles.

In: Brain Research, Vol. 571, No. 1, 31.01.1992, p. 97-102.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Armstead, William M. ; Mirro, Robert ; Zuckerman, Samuel ; Busija, David W. ; Leffler, Charles. / The influence of opioids on local cerebral glucose utilization in the newborn pig. In: Brain Research. 1992 ; Vol. 571, No. 1. pp. 97-102.
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