The intrinsic stability of Class I molar relationship

A longitudinal study of untreated cases

Edward Harris, Rolf G. Behrents

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

25 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Attainment of a Class I molar relationship (Angle) is often a prime treatment objective. In addition to considerations of improved function and skeletodental harmonies, a Class I relationship often is deemed the "correct" and stable situation. This study assessed the relative stability of the sagittal molar relationship in orthodontically untreated persons with full dentitions who were followed longitudinally from young (approximately 20 years) to older (approximately 55 years) adulthood. The Class I relationship is indeed most stable; none of 69 cases (sides) starting in a Class I cusp-in-groove relationship moved from that condition. In contrast, Class II relationships naturally became significantly "more" Class II (that is, greater distoclusion), and Class III cases shifted significantly to greater mesioclusion.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)63-67
Number of pages5
JournalAmerican Journal of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics
Volume94
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1988

Fingerprint

Dentition
Longitudinal Studies

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Orthodontics

Cite this

The intrinsic stability of Class I molar relationship : A longitudinal study of untreated cases. / Harris, Edward; Behrents, Rolf G.

In: American Journal of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics, Vol. 94, No. 1, 01.01.1988, p. 63-67.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{6eb85d692cc245788c07b86a817ed856,
title = "The intrinsic stability of Class I molar relationship: A longitudinal study of untreated cases",
abstract = "Attainment of a Class I molar relationship (Angle) is often a prime treatment objective. In addition to considerations of improved function and skeletodental harmonies, a Class I relationship often is deemed the {"}correct{"} and stable situation. This study assessed the relative stability of the sagittal molar relationship in orthodontically untreated persons with full dentitions who were followed longitudinally from young (approximately 20 years) to older (approximately 55 years) adulthood. The Class I relationship is indeed most stable; none of 69 cases (sides) starting in a Class I cusp-in-groove relationship moved from that condition. In contrast, Class II relationships naturally became significantly {"}more{"} Class II (that is, greater distoclusion), and Class III cases shifted significantly to greater mesioclusion.",
author = "Edward Harris and Behrents, {Rolf G.}",
year = "1988",
month = "1",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1016/0889-5406(88)90452-0",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "94",
pages = "63--67",
journal = "American Journal of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics",
issn = "0889-5406",
publisher = "Mosby Inc.",
number = "1",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - The intrinsic stability of Class I molar relationship

T2 - A longitudinal study of untreated cases

AU - Harris, Edward

AU - Behrents, Rolf G.

PY - 1988/1/1

Y1 - 1988/1/1

N2 - Attainment of a Class I molar relationship (Angle) is often a prime treatment objective. In addition to considerations of improved function and skeletodental harmonies, a Class I relationship often is deemed the "correct" and stable situation. This study assessed the relative stability of the sagittal molar relationship in orthodontically untreated persons with full dentitions who were followed longitudinally from young (approximately 20 years) to older (approximately 55 years) adulthood. The Class I relationship is indeed most stable; none of 69 cases (sides) starting in a Class I cusp-in-groove relationship moved from that condition. In contrast, Class II relationships naturally became significantly "more" Class II (that is, greater distoclusion), and Class III cases shifted significantly to greater mesioclusion.

AB - Attainment of a Class I molar relationship (Angle) is often a prime treatment objective. In addition to considerations of improved function and skeletodental harmonies, a Class I relationship often is deemed the "correct" and stable situation. This study assessed the relative stability of the sagittal molar relationship in orthodontically untreated persons with full dentitions who were followed longitudinally from young (approximately 20 years) to older (approximately 55 years) adulthood. The Class I relationship is indeed most stable; none of 69 cases (sides) starting in a Class I cusp-in-groove relationship moved from that condition. In contrast, Class II relationships naturally became significantly "more" Class II (that is, greater distoclusion), and Class III cases shifted significantly to greater mesioclusion.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0024040688&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0024040688&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/0889-5406(88)90452-0

DO - 10.1016/0889-5406(88)90452-0

M3 - Article

VL - 94

SP - 63

EP - 67

JO - American Journal of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics

JF - American Journal of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics

SN - 0889-5406

IS - 1

ER -