The lesser saphenous vein

Autogenous tissue for lower extremity revascularization

Fred A. Weaver, C. Robert Barlow, William Edwards, Joseph L. Mulherin, Judith M. Jenkins

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    34 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    From December 1980 to December 1985, 54 patients underwent 56 lower extremity arterial procedures with the use of lesser saphenous vein (LSV) as graft material. LSV was used in all cases because a satisfactory greater saphenous vein (GSV) was unavailable to accomplish the proposed revascularization. Indications for operation were rest pain, ulceration, and gangrene (74%), and 26% had claudication alone. Fifty of the 56 procedures were femorotibial and femoroperoneal bypasses. Three graft combinations were used: LSV alone (29), lesser saphenous vein and other autogenous vein composites (LSV/AUTO) (14), and lesser saphenous vein with synthetic composite grafts (LSV/SYN) (13). Graft patency rates were determined by life-table analysis. The 3-year patency rate for LSV was 60% and for LSV/AUTO was 38%. LSV/SYN graft composites had a graft patency rate at 18 months of 21%. These data suggest that the LSV may function as an autogenous venous graft for lower extremity revascularization when sufficient GSV is not available.

    Original languageEnglish (US)
    Pages (from-to)687-692
    Number of pages6
    JournalJournal of Vascular Surgery
    Volume5
    Issue number5
    DOIs
    StatePublished - Jan 1 1987

    Fingerprint

    Saphenous Vein
    Lower Extremity
    Transplants
    Life Tables
    Gangrene
    Veins

    All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

    • Surgery
    • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

    Cite this

    Weaver, F. A., Robert Barlow, C., Edwards, W., Mulherin, J. L., & Jenkins, J. M. (1987). The lesser saphenous vein: Autogenous tissue for lower extremity revascularization. Journal of Vascular Surgery, 5(5), 687-692. https://doi.org/10.1016/0741-5214(87)90155-8

    The lesser saphenous vein : Autogenous tissue for lower extremity revascularization. / Weaver, Fred A.; Robert Barlow, C.; Edwards, William; Mulherin, Joseph L.; Jenkins, Judith M.

    In: Journal of Vascular Surgery, Vol. 5, No. 5, 01.01.1987, p. 687-692.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    Weaver, FA, Robert Barlow, C, Edwards, W, Mulherin, JL & Jenkins, JM 1987, 'The lesser saphenous vein: Autogenous tissue for lower extremity revascularization', Journal of Vascular Surgery, vol. 5, no. 5, pp. 687-692. https://doi.org/10.1016/0741-5214(87)90155-8
    Weaver, Fred A. ; Robert Barlow, C. ; Edwards, William ; Mulherin, Joseph L. ; Jenkins, Judith M. / The lesser saphenous vein : Autogenous tissue for lower extremity revascularization. In: Journal of Vascular Surgery. 1987 ; Vol. 5, No. 5. pp. 687-692.
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