The math of making mutant mice

Robert Williams, L. Flaherty, D. W. Threadgill

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

21 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

More than ten large-scale mutagenesis projects are now generating hundreds of novel mouse mutants. Projects employ a wide variety of strategies and screens: targeting as much as the whole genome, part of a chromosome or just single genes. In this commentary, we consider the pros and cons of different tactics. We highlight issues of cost, efficiency and defend the impact of this mutagenesis program in an era of sophisticated conditional knockouts and advanced transgenic lines. Given the significant difficulties of adequately phenotyping and mapping randomly generated mutations that cover the whole genome, we tend to favor regional and gene-targeted screens. Whatever the choice of method, whole genome sequence data combined with detailed transcriptome and proteome surveys promise to significantly improve the efficiency with which series of mutations in a large subset of mammalian genes can be generated and cloned.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)191-200
Number of pages10
JournalGenes, Brain and Behavior
Volume2
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 1 2003

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Genome
Mutagenesis
Genes
Mutation
Proteome
Transcriptome
Chromosomes
Costs and Cost Analysis
Surveys and Questionnaires

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Genetics
  • Neurology
  • Behavioral Neuroscience

Cite this

The math of making mutant mice. / Williams, Robert; Flaherty, L.; Threadgill, D. W.

In: Genes, Brain and Behavior, Vol. 2, No. 4, 01.08.2003, p. 191-200.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Williams, Robert ; Flaherty, L. ; Threadgill, D. W. / The math of making mutant mice. In: Genes, Brain and Behavior. 2003 ; Vol. 2, No. 4. pp. 191-200.
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