The Men Who Care

An Analysis of Male Primary Caregivers Who Care for Frail Elderly at Home

Cyril F. Chang, Shelley White-Means

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

57 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The geriatric care literature has paid little attention to a small, yet sizable group of informal caregivers—men who care for a frail elderly relative at home. This lack of attention to male caregivers is not surprising because caregiving is traditionally regarded as a “woman's job,” usually assumed by a grown daughter or daughter-in-law of the care recipient. This study finds that 27% of the informal caregivers surveyed by the 1982 to 1984 National Long-Term Care Demonstration (the channeling study) are men. Male caregivers are predominantly the husbands of frail, elderly women, and they are more willing to abandon gender roles than are other male caregivers. Further, male caregivers in general appear to be healthier, more satisfied with life, more active in the labor market, and report less financial and physical stress from caregiving than do female caregivers. With the exception of spouses, our findings support the existing literature regarding the existence of strong gender differences in caregiving tasks and efforts.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)343-358
Number of pages16
JournalThe Journal of Applied Gerontology
Volume10
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1991

Fingerprint

Frail Elderly
Caregivers
Nuclear Family
Spouses
Long-Term Care
Geriatrics

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Gerontology
  • Geriatrics and Gerontology

Cite this

The Men Who Care : An Analysis of Male Primary Caregivers Who Care for Frail Elderly at Home. / Chang, Cyril F.; White-Means, Shelley.

In: The Journal of Applied Gerontology, Vol. 10, No. 3, 01.01.1991, p. 343-358.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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