The metabolism of 4-aminobutyrate (GABA) in fungi

Santosh Kumar, Narayan S. Punekar

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

48 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Information on the genetics and metabolism of 4-aminobutyrate (GABA) in yeasts and fungi is reviewed. In spite of ubiquitous occurrence, there is limited information on its function and biological role. Most fungi utilize GABA both as a carbon and a nitrogen source. Fungal endogenous GABA largely originates from the decarboxylation of L-glutamate and is associated with sporulation/spore metabolism. Whatever its source, GABA is catabolized to succinate via succinicsemialdehyde. Taken together these steps define a potential bypass outside the classical tricarboxylic acid cycle. Evidence for the existence of such a functional bypass in fungi is reviewed. The role of GABA and its metabolism in various facets of fungal biology is gradually emerging.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)403-409
Number of pages7
JournalMycological Research
Volume101
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1997

Fingerprint

Aminobutyrates
Fungi
metabolism
fungus
fungi
bypass
microbial genetics
decarboxylation
Decarboxylation
sporulation
Citric Acid Cycle
tricarboxylic acid cycle
Succinic Acid
succinic acid
Spores
glutamates
yeast
spore
Glutamic Acid
Nitrogen

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Biotechnology
  • Ecology, Evolution, Behavior and Systematics
  • Genetics
  • Plant Science

Cite this

The metabolism of 4-aminobutyrate (GABA) in fungi. / Kumar, Santosh; Punekar, Narayan S.

In: Mycological Research, Vol. 101, No. 4, 01.01.1997, p. 403-409.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Kumar, Santosh ; Punekar, Narayan S. / The metabolism of 4-aminobutyrate (GABA) in fungi. In: Mycological Research. 1997 ; Vol. 101, No. 4. pp. 403-409.
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