The outlook for implants and endodontics

A review of the tissue engineering strategies to create replacement teeth for patients

Peter E. Murray, Franklin Garcia-Godoy

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

10 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Ideally, root canal therapy involves the removal of diseased pulp tissues and permanent replacement with healthy pulp to revitalize teeth. Rather than placing implants, the ideal solution is to grow new replacement teeth. Success rates of implants and endodontic treatments can exceed 90%, which presents a formidable challenge to tissue engineering researchers to ensure that future dental treatments are even more successful. The purpose of this article is to explain how tissue engineering can be used to create replacement teeth. The science of tissue engineering has evolved from growing simple tissues in cell culture incubators to a multistep process. Although the problems of introducing tissue engineering therapies as part of routine dental treatments are substantial, the potential benefits are equally ground breaking.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)299-315
Number of pages17
JournalDental Clinics of North America
Volume50
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 1 2006
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Endodontics
Tissue Engineering
Tooth
Root Canal Therapy
Incubators
Cell- and Tissue-Based Therapy
Therapeutics
Cell Culture Techniques
Research Personnel

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Dentistry(all)

Cite this

The outlook for implants and endodontics : A review of the tissue engineering strategies to create replacement teeth for patients. / Murray, Peter E.; Garcia-Godoy, Franklin.

In: Dental Clinics of North America, Vol. 50, No. 2, 01.04.2006, p. 299-315.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

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