The perceived impact of stuttering on personality as measured by the NEO-FFI-3

Shivangi Banerjee, Devin Casenhiser, Tricia Hedinger, Tiffani Kittilstved, Tim Saltuklaroglu

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The NEO-FFI has been widely used to demonstrate personality differences between people who stutter (PWS) and those who do not. These differences can be interpreted as indicators of internal sources of disability that contribute to handicaps associated with stuttering. The aim of the current study was to use this same tool to determine the perceived impact of stuttering on personality in order to provide a similar indicator of how external factors may contribute to the stuttering disability. A total of 49 non-stuttering young adults were given the NEO-FFI-3 after watching a video of someone stuttering (moderately to severely) and after watching a video of someone speaking fluently. Participants were asked to answer test items while imagining that they had spoken like the persons in the videos for their entire lives. When asked to assume the stuttering perspective, participants reported themselves to be significantly more neurotic (P < 0.01) and less extraverted (P < 0.01) than when they assumed the perspective of the fluent speaker. The large differences (∼10 points; greater than one standard deviation) in these domains between the fluent and stuttered perspectives are consistent with existing stereotypes about PWS. These differences are greater than and only partially consistent with differences in personality found between PWS and non-stuttering individuals. The findings support the notion that external factors (e.g. listener reactions and stereotypes about PWS) contribute strongly to the manner in which stuttering restricts function and results in handicaps.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)22-28
Number of pages7
JournalLogopedics Phoniatrics Vocology
Volume42
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 2 2017

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Stuttering
Personality
Young Adult
Stutter

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Arts and Humanities (miscellaneous)
  • Speech and Hearing
  • LPN and LVN

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The perceived impact of stuttering on personality as measured by the NEO-FFI-3. / Banerjee, Shivangi; Casenhiser, Devin; Hedinger, Tricia; Kittilstved, Tiffani; Saltuklaroglu, Tim.

In: Logopedics Phoniatrics Vocology, Vol. 42, No. 1, 02.01.2017, p. 22-28.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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