The prevalence of Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans, Porphyromonas gingivalis, and bacteroides forsythus in humans 1 year after 4 randomized treatment modalities

Jacob Shiloah, Mark R. Patters, John W. Dean, Paul Bland, Gilbert Toledo

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN PROBING attachment changes in treated periodontal pockets and the prevalence of selected periodontal pathogens was assessed in 10 patients with adult periodontitis 1 year following randomized therapy. All patients had at least 1 tooth in each quadrant with an inflamed pocket of probing depth ≥5 mm and clinical attachment loss and harbored at least one of the following 3 major periodontal pathogens: Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans, Porphyromonas gingivalis, or Bacteroides forsythus. The number of target organisms per site was determined preoperatively; at 1 week; and at 1, 3, 6, and 12 months postoperatively utilizing DNA probes. The following clinical parameters were measured and recorded preoperatively and at 1, 3, 6, and 12 months post-treatment: gingival fluid flow, gingival index, plaque index, probing depth, probing attachment level, gingival recession, and bleeding on probing. One quadrant in each patient was randomly assigned to 1 of the following 4 treatments: 1) scaling and root planing; 2) pocket reduction through osseous surgery and apically-positioned flap; 3) modified Widman flap; and 4) modified Widman flap and topical application of saturated citric acid at pH l for 3 minutes. All 4 treatments were rendered in one appointment using local anesthesia. No postoperative antibiotics were used, but patients rinsed with 0.12% chlorhexidine for the first 3 months postoperatively and received a prophylaxis every 3 months. This investigation revealed: 1) 30.0% of the sites were infected by at least 1 species at 3, 6, and 12 months postoperatively. 2) Failing sites were infected by a high number of both Pg and Bf. These sites had a mean of 24.2 ± 9.0 × 103 Pg and 93.1 ± 42.0 × 103 Bf, while stable sites had a mean of 6.8 ± 0.5 × 103 Pg and 7.2 ± 1.2 × 103 Bf (P = 0.06 and P = 0.05, respectively). 3) The infected sites lost significantly more mean clinical attachment at 12 months (1.5 ± 0.5 mm compared to a loss of 0.2 ± 0.3 mm for uninfected sites, P = 0.017). 4) The infected sites had a significantly greater BOP (67 ± 14% versus 25 ± 8% for uninfected sites at 12 months, P = 0.012). 5) The choice of treatment modality did not affect the prevalence of the target species at 1 year post-treatment. These results suggest that prevalence of microbial pathogens negatively affects the 1 year outcome of periodontal surgical and nonsurgical therapy.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1364-1372
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of Periodontology
Volume69
Issue number12
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1998

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Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans
Porphyromonas gingivalis
Periodontal Index
Therapeutics
Root Planing
Gingival Recession
Periodontal Pocket
Chronic Periodontitis
Chlorhexidine
DNA Probes
Local Anesthesia
Tannerella forsythia
Citric Acid
Appointments and Schedules
Tooth
Anti-Bacterial Agents

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Periodontics

Cite this

The prevalence of Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans, Porphyromonas gingivalis, and bacteroides forsythus in humans 1 year after 4 randomized treatment modalities. / Shiloah, Jacob; Patters, Mark R.; Dean, John W.; Bland, Paul; Toledo, Gilbert.

In: Journal of Periodontology, Vol. 69, No. 12, 01.01.1998, p. 1364-1372.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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abstract = "THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN PROBING attachment changes in treated periodontal pockets and the prevalence of selected periodontal pathogens was assessed in 10 patients with adult periodontitis 1 year following randomized therapy. All patients had at least 1 tooth in each quadrant with an inflamed pocket of probing depth ≥5 mm and clinical attachment loss and harbored at least one of the following 3 major periodontal pathogens: Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans, Porphyromonas gingivalis, or Bacteroides forsythus. The number of target organisms per site was determined preoperatively; at 1 week; and at 1, 3, 6, and 12 months postoperatively utilizing DNA probes. The following clinical parameters were measured and recorded preoperatively and at 1, 3, 6, and 12 months post-treatment: gingival fluid flow, gingival index, plaque index, probing depth, probing attachment level, gingival recession, and bleeding on probing. One quadrant in each patient was randomly assigned to 1 of the following 4 treatments: 1) scaling and root planing; 2) pocket reduction through osseous surgery and apically-positioned flap; 3) modified Widman flap; and 4) modified Widman flap and topical application of saturated citric acid at pH l for 3 minutes. All 4 treatments were rendered in one appointment using local anesthesia. No postoperative antibiotics were used, but patients rinsed with 0.12{\%} chlorhexidine for the first 3 months postoperatively and received a prophylaxis every 3 months. This investigation revealed: 1) 30.0{\%} of the sites were infected by at least 1 species at 3, 6, and 12 months postoperatively. 2) Failing sites were infected by a high number of both Pg and Bf. These sites had a mean of 24.2 ± 9.0 × 103 Pg and 93.1 ± 42.0 × 103 Bf, while stable sites had a mean of 6.8 ± 0.5 × 103 Pg and 7.2 ± 1.2 × 103 Bf (P = 0.06 and P = 0.05, respectively). 3) The infected sites lost significantly more mean clinical attachment at 12 months (1.5 ± 0.5 mm compared to a loss of 0.2 ± 0.3 mm for uninfected sites, P = 0.017). 4) The infected sites had a significantly greater BOP (67 ± 14{\%} versus 25 ± 8{\%} for uninfected sites at 12 months, P = 0.012). 5) The choice of treatment modality did not affect the prevalence of the target species at 1 year post-treatment. These results suggest that prevalence of microbial pathogens negatively affects the 1 year outcome of periodontal surgical and nonsurgical therapy.",
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AB - THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN PROBING attachment changes in treated periodontal pockets and the prevalence of selected periodontal pathogens was assessed in 10 patients with adult periodontitis 1 year following randomized therapy. All patients had at least 1 tooth in each quadrant with an inflamed pocket of probing depth ≥5 mm and clinical attachment loss and harbored at least one of the following 3 major periodontal pathogens: Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans, Porphyromonas gingivalis, or Bacteroides forsythus. The number of target organisms per site was determined preoperatively; at 1 week; and at 1, 3, 6, and 12 months postoperatively utilizing DNA probes. The following clinical parameters were measured and recorded preoperatively and at 1, 3, 6, and 12 months post-treatment: gingival fluid flow, gingival index, plaque index, probing depth, probing attachment level, gingival recession, and bleeding on probing. One quadrant in each patient was randomly assigned to 1 of the following 4 treatments: 1) scaling and root planing; 2) pocket reduction through osseous surgery and apically-positioned flap; 3) modified Widman flap; and 4) modified Widman flap and topical application of saturated citric acid at pH l for 3 minutes. All 4 treatments were rendered in one appointment using local anesthesia. No postoperative antibiotics were used, but patients rinsed with 0.12% chlorhexidine for the first 3 months postoperatively and received a prophylaxis every 3 months. This investigation revealed: 1) 30.0% of the sites were infected by at least 1 species at 3, 6, and 12 months postoperatively. 2) Failing sites were infected by a high number of both Pg and Bf. These sites had a mean of 24.2 ± 9.0 × 103 Pg and 93.1 ± 42.0 × 103 Bf, while stable sites had a mean of 6.8 ± 0.5 × 103 Pg and 7.2 ± 1.2 × 103 Bf (P = 0.06 and P = 0.05, respectively). 3) The infected sites lost significantly more mean clinical attachment at 12 months (1.5 ± 0.5 mm compared to a loss of 0.2 ± 0.3 mm for uninfected sites, P = 0.017). 4) The infected sites had a significantly greater BOP (67 ± 14% versus 25 ± 8% for uninfected sites at 12 months, P = 0.012). 5) The choice of treatment modality did not affect the prevalence of the target species at 1 year post-treatment. These results suggest that prevalence of microbial pathogens negatively affects the 1 year outcome of periodontal surgical and nonsurgical therapy.

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