The Primary Results of the Treating Adult Smokers at Risk for Weight Gain with Interactive Technology (TARGIT) Study

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Abstract

Objective: To evaluate whether a behavioral weight management program combined with a smoking cessation program delivered via interactive technology could prevent postcessation weight gain. Methods: Three hundred and thirty young adult smokers, age 18 to 35 years, were randomized to a smoking cessation program alone (comparison group), which included behavioral counseling and nicotine replacement, or to a behavioral weight management program adapted from the Look AHEAD trial plus the same smoking cessation program (intervention group). Results: The Treating Adult Smokers at Risk for Weight Gain with Interactive Technology study randomized 164 participants to the comparison group and 166 participants to the intervention group. On average, the participants gained 0.91 kg after 24 months in the trial (comparison group + 1.45 kg and intervention group + 0.32; P = 0.157). The only variable systematically affecting weight change over time was smoking abstinence, in which those who were abstinent, on average, gained 0.14 kg more per month compared with those who continued to smoke (P < 0.001). In exploratory analyses, the intervention participants who were abstinent at 6 months had numerically smaller weight gains compared with abstinent participants in the comparison group, but these differences were not statistically significant. Conclusions: Providing an intensive weight gain prevention program combined with a smoking cessation program via interactive technology was not associated with greater long-term weight gain prevention.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1691-1698
Number of pages8
JournalObesity
Volume25
Issue number10
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1 2017

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Weight Gain
Smoking Cessation
Technology
Weights and Measures
Nicotine
Smoke
Counseling
Young Adult
Smoking

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism
  • Endocrinology
  • Nutrition and Dietetics

Cite this

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title = "The Primary Results of the Treating Adult Smokers at Risk for Weight Gain with Interactive Technology (TARGIT) Study",
abstract = "Objective: To evaluate whether a behavioral weight management program combined with a smoking cessation program delivered via interactive technology could prevent postcessation weight gain. Methods: Three hundred and thirty young adult smokers, age 18 to 35 years, were randomized to a smoking cessation program alone (comparison group), which included behavioral counseling and nicotine replacement, or to a behavioral weight management program adapted from the Look AHEAD trial plus the same smoking cessation program (intervention group). Results: The Treating Adult Smokers at Risk for Weight Gain with Interactive Technology study randomized 164 participants to the comparison group and 166 participants to the intervention group. On average, the participants gained 0.91 kg after 24 months in the trial (comparison group + 1.45 kg and intervention group + 0.32; P = 0.157). The only variable systematically affecting weight change over time was smoking abstinence, in which those who were abstinent, on average, gained 0.14 kg more per month compared with those who continued to smoke (P < 0.001). In exploratory analyses, the intervention participants who were abstinent at 6 months had numerically smaller weight gains compared with abstinent participants in the comparison group, but these differences were not statistically significant. Conclusions: Providing an intensive weight gain prevention program combined with a smoking cessation program via interactive technology was not associated with greater long-term weight gain prevention.",
author = "Karen Johnson and Fridtjof Thomas and Phyllis Richey and Tran, {Quynh T.} and Frances Tylavsky and Danielle Miro and Mathilda Coday",
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AU - Johnson, Karen

AU - Thomas, Fridtjof

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AU - Tran, Quynh T.

AU - Tylavsky, Frances

AU - Miro, Danielle

AU - Coday, Mathilda

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N2 - Objective: To evaluate whether a behavioral weight management program combined with a smoking cessation program delivered via interactive technology could prevent postcessation weight gain. Methods: Three hundred and thirty young adult smokers, age 18 to 35 years, were randomized to a smoking cessation program alone (comparison group), which included behavioral counseling and nicotine replacement, or to a behavioral weight management program adapted from the Look AHEAD trial plus the same smoking cessation program (intervention group). Results: The Treating Adult Smokers at Risk for Weight Gain with Interactive Technology study randomized 164 participants to the comparison group and 166 participants to the intervention group. On average, the participants gained 0.91 kg after 24 months in the trial (comparison group + 1.45 kg and intervention group + 0.32; P = 0.157). The only variable systematically affecting weight change over time was smoking abstinence, in which those who were abstinent, on average, gained 0.14 kg more per month compared with those who continued to smoke (P < 0.001). In exploratory analyses, the intervention participants who were abstinent at 6 months had numerically smaller weight gains compared with abstinent participants in the comparison group, but these differences were not statistically significant. Conclusions: Providing an intensive weight gain prevention program combined with a smoking cessation program via interactive technology was not associated with greater long-term weight gain prevention.

AB - Objective: To evaluate whether a behavioral weight management program combined with a smoking cessation program delivered via interactive technology could prevent postcessation weight gain. Methods: Three hundred and thirty young adult smokers, age 18 to 35 years, were randomized to a smoking cessation program alone (comparison group), which included behavioral counseling and nicotine replacement, or to a behavioral weight management program adapted from the Look AHEAD trial plus the same smoking cessation program (intervention group). Results: The Treating Adult Smokers at Risk for Weight Gain with Interactive Technology study randomized 164 participants to the comparison group and 166 participants to the intervention group. On average, the participants gained 0.91 kg after 24 months in the trial (comparison group + 1.45 kg and intervention group + 0.32; P = 0.157). The only variable systematically affecting weight change over time was smoking abstinence, in which those who were abstinent, on average, gained 0.14 kg more per month compared with those who continued to smoke (P < 0.001). In exploratory analyses, the intervention participants who were abstinent at 6 months had numerically smaller weight gains compared with abstinent participants in the comparison group, but these differences were not statistically significant. Conclusions: Providing an intensive weight gain prevention program combined with a smoking cessation program via interactive technology was not associated with greater long-term weight gain prevention.

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