The rationale for performing autologous peripheral blood stem cell transplants in community cancer centers

C. H. Weaver, W. West, Lee Schwartzberg, R. Birch, C. Dean Buckner

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

There is debate over whether or not the technology of peripheral blood stem cell (PBSC) support of high-dose chemotherapy (HDC) should be disseminated to practicing oncologists or continue to be administered only in academic referral centers. High-dose therapy with stem cell support is now the standard of care for selected patients with lymphoma, multiple myeloma and possibly breast cancer. Such therapies, delivered in a clinical trials setting, need to be more widely available to eligible patients. This manuscript presents the rationale for performing HDC with PBSC support in community cancer centers. The availability of PBSC has made the delivery of well-established HDC regimens safe and effective in an outpatient setting. Delivery of such therapy where the patient lives has many economic and social advantages to the patient compared to referral to a transplant center. In addition, more patients can be treated more cost effectively if such therapy is administered locally where the patient lives. From the scientific point of view, improved access to HDC in the community should increase accrual to clinical trials, allowing the generation of outcome data more rapidly.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)346-353
Number of pages8
JournalOncologist
Volume3
Issue number5
StatePublished - 1998

Fingerprint

Transplants
Drug Therapy
Neoplasms
Referral and Consultation
Clinical Trials
Therapeutics
Standard of Care
Multiple Myeloma
Peripheral Blood Stem Cells
Lymphoma
Outpatients
Stem Cells
Economics
Breast Neoplasms
Technology
Costs and Cost Analysis

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Cancer Research
  • Hematology

Cite this

The rationale for performing autologous peripheral blood stem cell transplants in community cancer centers. / Weaver, C. H.; West, W.; Schwartzberg, Lee; Birch, R.; Dean Buckner, C.

In: Oncologist, Vol. 3, No. 5, 1998, p. 346-353.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Weaver, C. H. ; West, W. ; Schwartzberg, Lee ; Birch, R. ; Dean Buckner, C. / The rationale for performing autologous peripheral blood stem cell transplants in community cancer centers. In: Oncologist. 1998 ; Vol. 3, No. 5. pp. 346-353.
@article{c01ddcb59eeb45469e94c0aebdde4bbc,
title = "The rationale for performing autologous peripheral blood stem cell transplants in community cancer centers",
abstract = "There is debate over whether or not the technology of peripheral blood stem cell (PBSC) support of high-dose chemotherapy (HDC) should be disseminated to practicing oncologists or continue to be administered only in academic referral centers. High-dose therapy with stem cell support is now the standard of care for selected patients with lymphoma, multiple myeloma and possibly breast cancer. Such therapies, delivered in a clinical trials setting, need to be more widely available to eligible patients. This manuscript presents the rationale for performing HDC with PBSC support in community cancer centers. The availability of PBSC has made the delivery of well-established HDC regimens safe and effective in an outpatient setting. Delivery of such therapy where the patient lives has many economic and social advantages to the patient compared to referral to a transplant center. In addition, more patients can be treated more cost effectively if such therapy is administered locally where the patient lives. From the scientific point of view, improved access to HDC in the community should increase accrual to clinical trials, allowing the generation of outcome data more rapidly.",
author = "Weaver, {C. H.} and W. West and Lee Schwartzberg and R. Birch and {Dean Buckner}, C.",
year = "1998",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "3",
pages = "346--353",
journal = "Oncologist",
issn = "1083-7159",
publisher = "AlphaMed Press",
number = "5",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - The rationale for performing autologous peripheral blood stem cell transplants in community cancer centers

AU - Weaver, C. H.

AU - West, W.

AU - Schwartzberg, Lee

AU - Birch, R.

AU - Dean Buckner, C.

PY - 1998

Y1 - 1998

N2 - There is debate over whether or not the technology of peripheral blood stem cell (PBSC) support of high-dose chemotherapy (HDC) should be disseminated to practicing oncologists or continue to be administered only in academic referral centers. High-dose therapy with stem cell support is now the standard of care for selected patients with lymphoma, multiple myeloma and possibly breast cancer. Such therapies, delivered in a clinical trials setting, need to be more widely available to eligible patients. This manuscript presents the rationale for performing HDC with PBSC support in community cancer centers. The availability of PBSC has made the delivery of well-established HDC regimens safe and effective in an outpatient setting. Delivery of such therapy where the patient lives has many economic and social advantages to the patient compared to referral to a transplant center. In addition, more patients can be treated more cost effectively if such therapy is administered locally where the patient lives. From the scientific point of view, improved access to HDC in the community should increase accrual to clinical trials, allowing the generation of outcome data more rapidly.

AB - There is debate over whether or not the technology of peripheral blood stem cell (PBSC) support of high-dose chemotherapy (HDC) should be disseminated to practicing oncologists or continue to be administered only in academic referral centers. High-dose therapy with stem cell support is now the standard of care for selected patients with lymphoma, multiple myeloma and possibly breast cancer. Such therapies, delivered in a clinical trials setting, need to be more widely available to eligible patients. This manuscript presents the rationale for performing HDC with PBSC support in community cancer centers. The availability of PBSC has made the delivery of well-established HDC regimens safe and effective in an outpatient setting. Delivery of such therapy where the patient lives has many economic and social advantages to the patient compared to referral to a transplant center. In addition, more patients can be treated more cost effectively if such therapy is administered locally where the patient lives. From the scientific point of view, improved access to HDC in the community should increase accrual to clinical trials, allowing the generation of outcome data more rapidly.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0031790472&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0031790472&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Article

VL - 3

SP - 346

EP - 353

JO - Oncologist

JF - Oncologist

SN - 1083-7159

IS - 5

ER -