The relationship between body mass index and post-cessation weight gain in the year after quitting smoking

A cross-sectional study

Rebecca Krukowski, Zoran Bursac, Melissa Little, Robert Klesges

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

11 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Introduction: There is wide variability in the amount of weight gained when quitting smoking, but little is known about key predictors of weight gain. We examined the impact of body mass index (BMI) category and sociodemographic variables on post-cessation weight gain. Materials and Methods: We utilized National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey data from five consecutive cycles of data collection from 2003-2004 to 2011-2012 to estimate post-cessation weight gain by BMI category among recent quitters (n = 654). We analyzed data on their "current weight" and their "past year weight". We also compared the recent quitters with current smokers, in order to estimate the amount of weight that could be attributed to quitting smoking. Results: Recent quitters gained 1.4 kg (95% CI: 0.8 to 2.0), while current smokers had a non-significant weight change (-0.01 kg (95% CI: -0.3 to 0.2). Weight gain was significant for those in the normal weight (3.1 kg, 95% CI: 2.3 to 3.9) and overweight BMI categories (2.2 kg, 95% CI: 1.1 to 3.2). Conclusions: BMI category is a key factor in the extent of post-cessation weight gain, with normal and overweight recent quitters gaining significant amounts of weight.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article numbere0151290
JournalPLoS ONE
Volume11
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1 2016

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Nutrition
cross-sectional studies
Weight Gain
body mass index
Body Mass Index
Cross-Sectional Studies
Smoking
weight gain
Health
Weights and Measures
National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey
Nutrition Surveys

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
  • Agricultural and Biological Sciences(all)

Cite this

The relationship between body mass index and post-cessation weight gain in the year after quitting smoking : A cross-sectional study. / Krukowski, Rebecca; Bursac, Zoran; Little, Melissa; Klesges, Robert.

In: PLoS ONE, Vol. 11, No. 3, e0151290, 01.03.2016.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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