The Relationship Between Body Weight Concerns and Adolescent Smoking

Diane E. Camp, Robert Klesges, George Relyea

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

185 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Although a number of factors have been found to predict smoking status among adolescents, few researchers have examined how belief in smoking as a weight-control strategy may be related to smoking in this high-risk population. With the goal of discovering whether belief in smoking as a weight-control strategy predicted smoking status, the present investigation surveyed 659 Black and White high school students. Analyses showed that among regular smokers, 39% of White female and 12% of White male smokers reported using smoking to control their appetite and weight. In contrast, not a single Black male or female reported using smoking to control appetite and weight. Although belief in smoking as a weight-control strategy did not predict regular smokers versus never smokers, the weight-belief item reliably separated experimental smokers from regular smokers. The survey also revealed that White female restrained eaters were the most likely to actually use smoking as a weight-control strategy.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)24-32
Number of pages9
JournalHealth Psychology
Volume12
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1993

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Smoking
Body Weight
Weights and Measures
Appetite
Research Personnel
Students
Population

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Applied Psychology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Cite this

The Relationship Between Body Weight Concerns and Adolescent Smoking. / Camp, Diane E.; Klesges, Robert; Relyea, George.

In: Health Psychology, Vol. 12, No. 1, 01.01.1993, p. 24-32.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Camp, Diane E. ; Klesges, Robert ; Relyea, George. / The Relationship Between Body Weight Concerns and Adolescent Smoking. In: Health Psychology. 1993 ; Vol. 12, No. 1. pp. 24-32.
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