The relationship between smoking and body weight in a population of young military personnel

Robert C. Klesges, Susan M. Zbikowski, C. Keith Haddock, G. Wayne Talcott, Harry A. Lando, Leslie A. Robinson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

32 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Evidence indicates that middle-aged smokers weigh less than nonsmokers and that smoking cessation reliably produces weight gain, but recent studies have questioned the weight control 'benefits' of smoking in younger populations (the time that people typically initiate smoking). The relationship between smoking and body weight was evaluated in all U.S. Air Force Basic Military Training recruits during a 1-year period (n = 32,144). Those who smoked prior to Basic Military Training (n = 10,440) were compared to never smokers or experimental smokers. Results indicated that regular- current smoking had no relationship to body weight in women (p > .05) and a very small effect in men (p < .05). Ethnicity, education, income, and duration and intensity of smoking did not affect the relationship between smoking and body weight. It was concluded that smoking has no effects on the body weights of young women and minimal effects in young men.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)454-458
Number of pages5
JournalHealth Psychology
Volume17
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 12 1998

Fingerprint

Military Personnel
Smoking
Body Weight
Population
Smoking Cessation
Weight Gain
Air
Education
Weights and Measures

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Applied Psychology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Cite this

Klesges, R. C., Zbikowski, S. M., Keith Haddock, C., Wayne Talcott, G., Lando, H. A., & Robinson, L. A. (1998). The relationship between smoking and body weight in a population of young military personnel. Health Psychology, 17(5), 454-458. https://doi.org/10.1037/0278-6133.17.5.454

The relationship between smoking and body weight in a population of young military personnel. / Klesges, Robert C.; Zbikowski, Susan M.; Keith Haddock, C.; Wayne Talcott, G.; Lando, Harry A.; Robinson, Leslie A.

In: Health Psychology, Vol. 17, No. 5, 12.10.1998, p. 454-458.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Klesges, RC, Zbikowski, SM, Keith Haddock, C, Wayne Talcott, G, Lando, HA & Robinson, LA 1998, 'The relationship between smoking and body weight in a population of young military personnel', Health Psychology, vol. 17, no. 5, pp. 454-458. https://doi.org/10.1037/0278-6133.17.5.454
Klesges RC, Zbikowski SM, Keith Haddock C, Wayne Talcott G, Lando HA, Robinson LA. The relationship between smoking and body weight in a population of young military personnel. Health Psychology. 1998 Oct 12;17(5):454-458. https://doi.org/10.1037/0278-6133.17.5.454
Klesges, Robert C. ; Zbikowski, Susan M. ; Keith Haddock, C. ; Wayne Talcott, G. ; Lando, Harry A. ; Robinson, Leslie A. / The relationship between smoking and body weight in a population of young military personnel. In: Health Psychology. 1998 ; Vol. 17, No. 5. pp. 454-458.
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