The resident and fellow relationship in obstetrics and gynecology

William Metheny, Donald M. Sherline

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

11 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

In a nationwide survey, chief administrative residents reported their views on how subspecialty fellowships affect their residency training in obstetrics and gynecology. The residents felt that fellows improve the quality of their training, depending on the degree they consider fellows as junior faculty involved in teaching and modeling patient care. Competition for surgical cases, and the surgical priority fellows have over residents in the new technology and nonroutine cases, potentially detract from the resident-fellow training relationship. These factors varied by subspecialty and the particular content areas of the fellowship. The residents' comments highlight the positive and negative components of each fellowship and identify the features of their relationship with the fellows. The implications of these findings for enhancing this relationship are presented.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)618-624
Number of pages7
JournalAmerican Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology
Volume158
Issue number3 PART 1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1988
Externally publishedYes

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Gynecology
Obstetrics
Internship and Residency
Patient Care
Teaching
Technology

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Obstetrics and Gynecology

Cite this

The resident and fellow relationship in obstetrics and gynecology. / Metheny, William; Sherline, Donald M.

In: American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Vol. 158, No. 3 PART 1, 01.01.1988, p. 618-624.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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