The response of bone in primates around unloaded dental implants supporting prostheses with different levels of fit

Alan B. Carr, David Gerard, Peter E. Larsen

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

145 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Implant failure as a consequence of prosthetic loading following clinical determination of successful stage I healing is poorly understood. A basic premise of accepted prosthetic protocol is passive connection of multiunit prostheses to the implant support. To better understand mechanical factors related to implant failure, this basic passivity premise was experimentally tested prior to study of functional loading research. The purpose of this preliminary study was to measure the bone response around implants placed in the mandible of baboons that supported prostheses exhibiting two levels of fit and not loaded occlusally. Screw-retained prostheses that exhibited a mean linear distortion of 38 microns and 345 microns made up the fit and misfit groups respectively. The results failed to distinguish a difference in bone response between the two levels of prosthetic fit. Although the finding can be argued as a sample size limitation, the data strongly suggest an opposite response than is clinically expected and, consequently, does not warrant the use of additional animals in this initial study. Because the design of this study does not mimic the clinical application of misfitting prostheses (where dynamic functional loads are superimposed with misfit loads), it cannot be inferred that, in clinical application, fit does not alter the osseointegrated interface. Ongoing investigation of failure due to nonpassive connections under dynamic loading conditions of mastication will help clarify the clinical significance of passivity.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)500-509
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of Prosthetic Dentistry
Volume76
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1996

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Dental Implants
Primates
Prostheses and Implants
Bone and Bones
Papio
Mastication
Mandible
Sample Size
Research

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Oral Surgery

Cite this

The response of bone in primates around unloaded dental implants supporting prostheses with different levels of fit. / Carr, Alan B.; Gerard, David; Larsen, Peter E.

In: Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry, Vol. 76, No. 5, 01.01.1996, p. 500-509.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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