The Risk of Curve Progression and Surgery in African Americans With Adolescent Idiopathic Scoliosis

Taylor Lara, Nelson Astur, Tamekia Jones, Vinayak Perake, Alice Moisan, William C. Warner, Jeffery R. Sawyer, Derek M. Kelly

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Study Design Retrospective clinical cohort study. Objective To determine if certain risk factors (age, curve magnitude, skeletal maturity, gender, and curve pattern) traditionally associated with curve progression and surgical intervention in the general population apply equally to African Americans. Summary of Background Data Currently, information is limited on the role that a patient's race plays in the risk of curve progression of adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS), and existing studies have conflicting results. Methods Retrospective search of records identified patients who were African American, had been diagnosed with AIS, had a major curve Cobb angle of 10 degrees or more, and had at least two clinical visits with spinal radiographs at least 90 days apart to determine the risk factors for surgical treatment, and 2 years apart to determine the risk factors for curve progression. Patients with a medical condition likely to cause scoliosis were excluded. Results Of 738 African American patients with AIS, 223 were assessed for surgical risk factors, and 72 were assessed for curve progression risk factors. Fifty-six (29.17%) had progression of the major coronal curve, and 38 (17.04%) underwent surgery. Age at presentation and curve magnitude at presentation were significant risk factors for surgical intervention. Curve magnitude at presentation was a significant risk factor for curve progression. No significant relationships were found for gender or curve type as they relate to surgical intervention or curve progression. Conclusion Age and curve magnitude at presentation were significantly associated with surgery, as is true in other scoliosis populations. Curve magnitude at presentation was associated with curve progression. In contrast to studies in other populations, however, no significant association was observed between curve progression and age at presentation, curve type, or gender, or between surgery and curve type or gender. Level of Evidence Level III, prognostic cohort study.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)250-254
Number of pages5
JournalSpine Deformity
Volume5
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 1 2017

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Scoliosis
African Americans
Cohort Studies
Population
Retrospective Studies

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Orthopedics and Sports Medicine

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The Risk of Curve Progression and Surgery in African Americans With Adolescent Idiopathic Scoliosis. / Lara, Taylor; Astur, Nelson; Jones, Tamekia; Perake, Vinayak; Moisan, Alice; Warner, William C.; Sawyer, Jeffery R.; Kelly, Derek M.

In: Spine Deformity, Vol. 5, No. 4, 01.07.2017, p. 250-254.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Lara, T, Astur, N, Jones, T, Perake, V, Moisan, A, Warner, WC, Sawyer, JR & Kelly, DM 2017, 'The Risk of Curve Progression and Surgery in African Americans With Adolescent Idiopathic Scoliosis', Spine Deformity, vol. 5, no. 4, pp. 250-254. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jspd.2017.01.013
Lara, Taylor ; Astur, Nelson ; Jones, Tamekia ; Perake, Vinayak ; Moisan, Alice ; Warner, William C. ; Sawyer, Jeffery R. ; Kelly, Derek M. / The Risk of Curve Progression and Surgery in African Americans With Adolescent Idiopathic Scoliosis. In: Spine Deformity. 2017 ; Vol. 5, No. 4. pp. 250-254.
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abstract = "Study Design Retrospective clinical cohort study. Objective To determine if certain risk factors (age, curve magnitude, skeletal maturity, gender, and curve pattern) traditionally associated with curve progression and surgical intervention in the general population apply equally to African Americans. Summary of Background Data Currently, information is limited on the role that a patient's race plays in the risk of curve progression of adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS), and existing studies have conflicting results. Methods Retrospective search of records identified patients who were African American, had been diagnosed with AIS, had a major curve Cobb angle of 10 degrees or more, and had at least two clinical visits with spinal radiographs at least 90 days apart to determine the risk factors for surgical treatment, and 2 years apart to determine the risk factors for curve progression. Patients with a medical condition likely to cause scoliosis were excluded. Results Of 738 African American patients with AIS, 223 were assessed for surgical risk factors, and 72 were assessed for curve progression risk factors. Fifty-six (29.17{\%}) had progression of the major coronal curve, and 38 (17.04{\%}) underwent surgery. Age at presentation and curve magnitude at presentation were significant risk factors for surgical intervention. Curve magnitude at presentation was a significant risk factor for curve progression. No significant relationships were found for gender or curve type as they relate to surgical intervention or curve progression. Conclusion Age and curve magnitude at presentation were significantly associated with surgery, as is true in other scoliosis populations. Curve magnitude at presentation was associated with curve progression. In contrast to studies in other populations, however, no significant association was observed between curve progression and age at presentation, curve type, or gender, or between surgery and curve type or gender. Level of Evidence Level III, prognostic cohort study.",
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AU - Moisan, Alice

AU - Warner, William C.

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N2 - Study Design Retrospective clinical cohort study. Objective To determine if certain risk factors (age, curve magnitude, skeletal maturity, gender, and curve pattern) traditionally associated with curve progression and surgical intervention in the general population apply equally to African Americans. Summary of Background Data Currently, information is limited on the role that a patient's race plays in the risk of curve progression of adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS), and existing studies have conflicting results. Methods Retrospective search of records identified patients who were African American, had been diagnosed with AIS, had a major curve Cobb angle of 10 degrees or more, and had at least two clinical visits with spinal radiographs at least 90 days apart to determine the risk factors for surgical treatment, and 2 years apart to determine the risk factors for curve progression. Patients with a medical condition likely to cause scoliosis were excluded. Results Of 738 African American patients with AIS, 223 were assessed for surgical risk factors, and 72 were assessed for curve progression risk factors. Fifty-six (29.17%) had progression of the major coronal curve, and 38 (17.04%) underwent surgery. Age at presentation and curve magnitude at presentation were significant risk factors for surgical intervention. Curve magnitude at presentation was a significant risk factor for curve progression. No significant relationships were found for gender or curve type as they relate to surgical intervention or curve progression. Conclusion Age and curve magnitude at presentation were significantly associated with surgery, as is true in other scoliosis populations. Curve magnitude at presentation was associated with curve progression. In contrast to studies in other populations, however, no significant association was observed between curve progression and age at presentation, curve type, or gender, or between surgery and curve type or gender. Level of Evidence Level III, prognostic cohort study.

AB - Study Design Retrospective clinical cohort study. Objective To determine if certain risk factors (age, curve magnitude, skeletal maturity, gender, and curve pattern) traditionally associated with curve progression and surgical intervention in the general population apply equally to African Americans. Summary of Background Data Currently, information is limited on the role that a patient's race plays in the risk of curve progression of adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS), and existing studies have conflicting results. Methods Retrospective search of records identified patients who were African American, had been diagnosed with AIS, had a major curve Cobb angle of 10 degrees or more, and had at least two clinical visits with spinal radiographs at least 90 days apart to determine the risk factors for surgical treatment, and 2 years apart to determine the risk factors for curve progression. Patients with a medical condition likely to cause scoliosis were excluded. Results Of 738 African American patients with AIS, 223 were assessed for surgical risk factors, and 72 were assessed for curve progression risk factors. Fifty-six (29.17%) had progression of the major coronal curve, and 38 (17.04%) underwent surgery. Age at presentation and curve magnitude at presentation were significant risk factors for surgical intervention. Curve magnitude at presentation was a significant risk factor for curve progression. No significant relationships were found for gender or curve type as they relate to surgical intervention or curve progression. Conclusion Age and curve magnitude at presentation were significantly associated with surgery, as is true in other scoliosis populations. Curve magnitude at presentation was associated with curve progression. In contrast to studies in other populations, however, no significant association was observed between curve progression and age at presentation, curve type, or gender, or between surgery and curve type or gender. Level of Evidence Level III, prognostic cohort study.

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