The role of exosomal transport of viral agents in persistent HIV pathogenesis

Benjamin J. Patters, Santosh Kumar

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Abstract

Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection, despite great advances in antiretroviral therapy, remains a lifelong affliction. Though current treatment regimens can effectively suppress viral load to undetectable levels and preserve healthy immune function, they cannot fully alleviate all symptoms caused by the presence of the virus, such as HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders. Exosomes are small vesicles that transport cellular proteins, RNA, and small molecules between cells as a mechanism of intercellular communication. Recent research has shown that HIV proteins and RNA can be packaged into exosomes and transported between cells, to pathogenic effect. This review summarizes the current knowledge on the diverse mechanisms involved in the sorting of viral elements into exosomes and the damage those exosomal agents can inflict. In addition, potential therapeutic options to counteract exosome-mediated HIV pathogenesis are reviewed and considered.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number79
JournalRetrovirology
Volume15
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 22 2018

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Exosomes
HIV
RNA
Human Immunodeficiency Virus Proteins
Virus Diseases
Viral Load
Carrier Proteins
Viruses
Therapeutics
Research

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Virology
  • Infectious Diseases

Cite this

The role of exosomal transport of viral agents in persistent HIV pathogenesis. / Patters, Benjamin J.; Kumar, Santosh.

In: Retrovirology, Vol. 15, No. 1, 79, 22.12.2018.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

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