The role of laparoscopy in trauma

A ten-year review of diagnosis and therapeutics

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

11 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Minimally invasive surgery has found many applications in general surgery. The role of laparoscopy in trauma has been debated as a diagnostic, as well as therapeutic, tool in hemodynamically stable patients. This study evaluated laparoscopy in the trauma population. A retrospective review of all laparoscopics performed in hemodynamically stable trauma patients from 1996 until 2006 was conducted. Mechanisms of injury, perioperative data, and demographic variables were analyzed using descriptive statistics and Student's t test. Exploratory diagnostic laparoscopy was performed on 102 patients. Laparoscopy was negative for 65 per cent of patients; 12 per cent of these were converted to laparotomy due to adhesions, hemoperitoneum, or surgeon preference. None of the conversions revealed intra-abdominal injury at laparotomy. An injury was diagnosed at laparoscopy in the remaining 35 per cent, with 55 per cent conversion rate to repair the injury. Therapeutic laparoscopy included serosal repair, hemorrhage control, diaphragmatic repair, and other standard laparoscopic treatments. No patient required re-exploration, there were no missed injuries or other complications, and no patient died in this study. Laparoscopy has an important diagnostic and therapeutic role in selected hemodynamically stable trauma patients. Using a minimally invasive approach can reduce the potential morbidity of negative laparotomy.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1166-1170
Number of pages5
JournalAmerican Surgeon
Volume74
Issue number12
StatePublished - Dec 1 2008

Fingerprint

Laparoscopy
Wounds and Injuries
Laparotomy
Therapeutics
Hemoperitoneum
Abdominal Injuries
Minimally Invasive Surgical Procedures
Demography
Hemorrhage
Students
Morbidity
Population

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Surgery
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

The role of laparoscopy in trauma : A ten-year review of diagnosis and therapeutics. / Mallat, Ali F.; Mancini, Matthew; Daley, Brian; Enderson, Blaine.

In: American Surgeon, Vol. 74, No. 12, 01.12.2008, p. 1166-1170.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

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