The role of opiates and endogenous opioid peptides in the regulation of rat TSH secretion

Burt Sharp, John E. Morley, Harold E. Carlson, Jody Gordon, Jacqueline Briggs, Shlomo Melmed, Jerome M. Hershman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

The administration of morphine to rats at room temperature is reported to suppress serum thyrotropin (TSH) levels by a hypothalamic mechanism. However, it is unknown whether endogenous opioid peptides (EOP) are involved in the control of TSH secretion. The present studies show that naloxone (10 mg/kg, i.p.), an opiate-receptor antagonist, prevented the decline in rat serum TSH which occurs with heat exposure. Morphine sulfate (20 mg/kg, i.p.) treatment prevented the cold-induced elevation in serum TSH, and pretreatment with haloperidol (0.3 mg/kg, i.p.) eliminated morphine's influence. Medial-basal hypothalamic thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH) content, measured by RIA, increased in the morphine-treated rats which were exposed to 4 °C. A submaximal intravenous dose of TRH (300 ng/100 g) was given to determine whether morphine suppresses serum TSH through the release of hypothalamic thyrotropic inhibitors. Morphine pretreatment did not alter TSH stimulation by TRH. Morphine alone or combined with TRH did not alter basal or stimulated TSH secretion in vitro. These studies strongly suggest that, in rats, the EOP modulate TSH secretion under conditions such as acute heat exposure which are associated with a decline in serum TSH. Under specific circumstances, the suppression of serum TSH morphine may be dopamine-dependent.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)335-344
Number of pages10
JournalBrain Research
Volume219
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 31 1981

Fingerprint

Opioid Peptides
Morphine
Thyrotropin-Releasing Hormone
Serum
Hot Temperature
Pituitary Hormone-Releasing Hormones
Opioid Receptors
Haloperidol
Thyrotropin
Naloxone
Dopamine
Temperature

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Neuroscience(all)
  • Molecular Biology
  • Clinical Neurology
  • Developmental Biology

Cite this

Sharp, B., Morley, J. E., Carlson, H. E., Gordon, J., Briggs, J., Melmed, S., & Hershman, J. M. (1981). The role of opiates and endogenous opioid peptides in the regulation of rat TSH secretion. Brain Research, 219(2), 335-344. https://doi.org/10.1016/0006-8993(81)90296-1

The role of opiates and endogenous opioid peptides in the regulation of rat TSH secretion. / Sharp, Burt; Morley, John E.; Carlson, Harold E.; Gordon, Jody; Briggs, Jacqueline; Melmed, Shlomo; Hershman, Jerome M.

In: Brain Research, Vol. 219, No. 2, 31.08.1981, p. 335-344.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Sharp, B, Morley, JE, Carlson, HE, Gordon, J, Briggs, J, Melmed, S & Hershman, JM 1981, 'The role of opiates and endogenous opioid peptides in the regulation of rat TSH secretion', Brain Research, vol. 219, no. 2, pp. 335-344. https://doi.org/10.1016/0006-8993(81)90296-1
Sharp, Burt ; Morley, John E. ; Carlson, Harold E. ; Gordon, Jody ; Briggs, Jacqueline ; Melmed, Shlomo ; Hershman, Jerome M. / The role of opiates and endogenous opioid peptides in the regulation of rat TSH secretion. In: Brain Research. 1981 ; Vol. 219, No. 2. pp. 335-344.
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