The role of radical parametrectomy in the treatment of occult cervical carcinoma after extrafascial hysterectomy

Charles A. Leath, J. Michael Straughn, Snehal M. Bhoola, Edward E. Partridge, Larry Kilgore, Ronald D. Alvarez

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Abstract

Objectives. To assess the morbidity and efficacy of radical parametrectomy (RP) performed following extrafascial hysterectomy in patients with occult cervical carcinoma. Methods. An IRB approved retrospective chart review identified 23 patients that underwent RP with pelvic and/or para-aortic lymphadenectomy and upper vaginectomy. Data were collected on demographics, tumor stage, grade, histology, indication for hysterectomy, surgical findings, complications, recurrence, and survival. Results. Of the 23 patients, 2 patients had a stage IA2 lesion while 21 patients had a stage IB 1 lesion. There were 5 patients with a grade 1 tumor, 10 with grade 2, 4 with grade 3, and 4 with unknown grade. Median age was 41 years (range 27-59). The most common indication (48%) for extrafascial hysterectomy was CIS of the cervix. Four patients (17%) had metastasis to pelvic nodes or evidence of tumor at the margin at the time of RP. Three of these 4 patients with a positive specimen received adjuvant radiation and all are alive (mean follow-up 66 months). One patient declined radiation and is alive at 42 months. There were 7 (30%) operative complications: Most notably 4 patients received blood transfusions. Two of 19 patients (11%) with no residual tumor in RP specimen recurred and 1 patient was salvaged with radiation (follow-up 103 months). With a median follow-up of 61 months (range 9-103), overall 5-year survival is 96%. Conclusions. RP is an acceptable option for patients diagnosed with an occult cervical carcinoma at the time of extrafascial hysterectomy. Careful selection of RP for patients unlikely to have residual tumor will obviate the need for radiation in most instances.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)215-219
Number of pages5
JournalGynecologic oncology
Volume92
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2004

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Hysterectomy
Carcinoma
Therapeutics
Radiation
Residual Neoplasm
Neoplasms
Survival
Research Ethics Committees
Lymph Node Excision
Cervix Uteri
Blood Transfusion
Histology
Demography

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Oncology
  • Obstetrics and Gynecology

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The role of radical parametrectomy in the treatment of occult cervical carcinoma after extrafascial hysterectomy. / Leath, Charles A.; Straughn, J. Michael; Bhoola, Snehal M.; Partridge, Edward E.; Kilgore, Larry; Alvarez, Ronald D.

In: Gynecologic oncology, Vol. 92, No. 1, 01.01.2004, p. 215-219.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Leath, Charles A. ; Straughn, J. Michael ; Bhoola, Snehal M. ; Partridge, Edward E. ; Kilgore, Larry ; Alvarez, Ronald D. / The role of radical parametrectomy in the treatment of occult cervical carcinoma after extrafascial hysterectomy. In: Gynecologic oncology. 2004 ; Vol. 92, No. 1. pp. 215-219.
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abstract = "Objectives. To assess the morbidity and efficacy of radical parametrectomy (RP) performed following extrafascial hysterectomy in patients with occult cervical carcinoma. Methods. An IRB approved retrospective chart review identified 23 patients that underwent RP with pelvic and/or para-aortic lymphadenectomy and upper vaginectomy. Data were collected on demographics, tumor stage, grade, histology, indication for hysterectomy, surgical findings, complications, recurrence, and survival. Results. Of the 23 patients, 2 patients had a stage IA2 lesion while 21 patients had a stage IB 1 lesion. There were 5 patients with a grade 1 tumor, 10 with grade 2, 4 with grade 3, and 4 with unknown grade. Median age was 41 years (range 27-59). The most common indication (48{\%}) for extrafascial hysterectomy was CIS of the cervix. Four patients (17{\%}) had metastasis to pelvic nodes or evidence of tumor at the margin at the time of RP. Three of these 4 patients with a positive specimen received adjuvant radiation and all are alive (mean follow-up 66 months). One patient declined radiation and is alive at 42 months. There were 7 (30{\%}) operative complications: Most notably 4 patients received blood transfusions. Two of 19 patients (11{\%}) with no residual tumor in RP specimen recurred and 1 patient was salvaged with radiation (follow-up 103 months). With a median follow-up of 61 months (range 9-103), overall 5-year survival is 96{\%}. Conclusions. RP is an acceptable option for patients diagnosed with an occult cervical carcinoma at the time of extrafascial hysterectomy. Careful selection of RP for patients unlikely to have residual tumor will obviate the need for radiation in most instances.",
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