The Role of the Primary Sensory Cortices in Early Language Processing

Andrew C. Papanicolaou, Marina Kilintari, Roozbeh Rezaie, Shalini Narayana, Abbas Babajani-Feremi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The results of this magnetoencephalography study challenge two long-standing assumptions regarding the brain mechanisms of language processing: First, that linguistic processing proper follows sensory feature processing effected by bilateral activation of the primary sensory cortices that lasts about 100 msec from stimulus onset. Second, that subsequent linguistic processing is effected by left hemisphere networks outside the primary sensory areas, including Broca's and Wernicke's association cortices. Here we present evidence that linguistic analysis begins almost synchronously with sensory, prelinguistic verbal input analysis and that the primary cortices are also engaged in these linguistic analyses and become, consequently, part of the left hemisphere language network during language tasks. These findings call for extensive revision of our conception of linguistic processing in the brain.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1755-1765
Number of pages11
JournalJournal of cognitive neuroscience
Volume29
Issue number10
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1 2017

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Linguistics
Language
Magnetoencephalography
Brain

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Cognitive Neuroscience

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The Role of the Primary Sensory Cortices in Early Language Processing. / Papanicolaou, Andrew C.; Kilintari, Marina; Rezaie, Roozbeh; Narayana, Shalini; Babajani-Feremi, Abbas.

In: Journal of cognitive neuroscience, Vol. 29, No. 10, 01.10.2017, p. 1755-1765.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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